sensuality


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sen·su·al·i·ty

(sen'shū-al'i-tē),
The state or quality of being sensual.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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All sensuality is one, though it takes many forms; all purity is one.
We discourse freely without shame of one form of sensuality, and are silent about another.
Any nobleness begins at once to refine a man's features, any meanness or sensuality to imbrute them.
The imperfections of his mind run parallel with those of his body, being a composition of spleen, dullness, ignorance, caprice, sensuality, and pride.
Pale, motionless, overwhelmed by this frightful revelation, dazzled by the superhuman beauty of this woman who unveiled herself before him with an immodesty which appeared to him sublime, he ended by falling on his knees before her as the early Christians did before those pure and holy martyrs whom the persecution of the emperors gave up in the circus to the sanguinary sensuality of the populace.
In this era, which has seen essentially a countertenor revolution, Walker says the fascination of a voice like his lies in its unique quality: "Because of the range--being able to project certain colors or perspectives--it offers a sensuality that a tenor can't do.
Perhaps what makes jazz accessible to audiences and yet somewhat problematic for artists is its connection with sex and sensuality. The word itself derives from "jass," a slang word for sex that developed in early twentieth-century New Orleans.
The sensuality of this mythical creature is thwarted by its crumpled and ungainly appearance.
Medieval France comes alive with all of its brutality, religious fervor, sensuality and sexual passion, and the daily struggle to survive.
With its expressive roof, golden ceiling and undulating walls, the chapel has elements of Baroque sensuality, yet the intimate interior exudes an air of contemplative calmness and sobriety.
Desert Hearts (1986)--Leave it to a woman (director Donna Deitch) to create a lesbian sex scene in which the undeniably palpable chemistry--between Helen Shaver (as a repressed woman getting a Reno divorce) and Patricia Charbonneau (as a lusty local gal)--relies as much on the characters' burgeoning love as on the actresses' sensuality.
La Maquina incorporates the joy and sensuality of social dance forms with the complex rhythms and movements of the Afro-Caribbean diaspora.