sensual

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sen·su·al

(sen'shū-ăl),
1. Relating to the body and the senses, as distinguished from the intellect or spirit.
2. Denoting bodily or sensory pleasure, not necessarily sexual.
[L. sensualis, endowed with feeling]

sensual

[sen′sho̅o̅·əl]
Etymology: L, sensualis
pertaining to a great interest in sex, food, or other sense-satisfying topics.

sen·su·al

(sen'shū-ăl)
1. Relating to the body and the senses, as distinguished from the intellect or spirit.
2. Denoting bodily or sensory pleasure, not necessarily sexual.
[L. sensualis, endowed with feeling]

sen·su·al

(sen'shū-ăl)
1. Relating to the body and the senses, as distinguished from the intellect or spirit.
2. Denoting bodily or sensory pleasure, not necessarily sexual.
[L. sensualis, endowed with feeling]
References in periodicals archive ?
While he is a self-professed sensualist in life-style, his description of his intuitive judging of the individual against the ideal seems to owe a good deal to Cousin's neo-Platonism: it resides above all in form: "J'adore sur toutes choses la beaute de la forme;--la beaute pour moi, c'est la Divinite visible, c'est le bonheur palpable, c'est le ciel descendu sur la terre" (269) ["I adore above all things the beauty of form; beauty, for me, is visible Divinity, palpable happiness descended on earth" (136-37)].
Samaniego explored natural sexual desire in his unpublished verses, El jardin de Venus, as a cornerstone of sensualist epistemology, as a satiric slap in the face of the church-state establishment and as pure entertainment.
In passages like this, Friskics-Warren reveals not only a particular musician's temperament--empathetic, sensualist, dystopian, prophet--but the very nature of the temperament itself.
Another pair of essays links Daniel Lee's overly schematic and one-sided view of "religion and the construction of White America'--drawn mostly from articles in late-nineteenth-century periodicals that echo Josiah Strong's visions of preserving a white Christian America in the face of an onslaught of freedpeople, immigrants, and other threats to the Republic--together with an interesting analysis of the somewhat embarrassing attempts of progressive Catholics in Brazil to provide an "Afro" mass that will speak to the ostensibly sensualist and rhythmic heart still beating within Catholic Afro-Brazilians.
It is Gordon's thesis that this founding mother of feminism--far from being a strident caricature, a disappointed rationalist, a wanton sensualist, or a despondent basket case--was brave, tireless, resilient, authentic, original, an exploder of exhausted and/or cliched literary genres, an eloquent proponent of a better world of nonviolent nurturing, and in many ways a model of the rich new female characters who would show up in Jane Austen, as well as in novels by Charlotte Bronte, Virginia Woolf, and Henry James (about all of whom Gordon has also written biographies).
I'm afraid the good judge would today favor banning Stern from the airways, because there is little else to the show but the leer of the sensualist.
Espinosa is a sensualist who lakes time to enjoy the pre-Christmas summer warmth, the sun drenched beach, the sultry Rio nights, the exquisiteness of Kika's navel.
You will have Bamba for company, in the nine 'Catlogues'--the author's conversations with his erudite but sensualist cat, Bamba--that could enliven your journey.
There is Washington as the canny politician, Franklin as the wise old sensualist and the short, fat John Adams ("His Rotundity") as someone oscillating between bouts of vanity and self-pity.
Saiser, a sensualist, focuses on the physicality of place as well as the immediacy of the body.
Foucauld was a womaniser, a layabout sensualist who lounged in bed eating foie gras out of a tin with a silver spoon.