sensual

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sen·su·al

(sen'shū-ăl),
1. Relating to the body and the senses, as distinguished from the intellect or spirit.
2. Denoting bodily or sensory pleasure, not necessarily sexual.
[L. sensualis, endowed with feeling]

sensual

[sen′sho̅o̅·əl]
Etymology: L, sensualis
pertaining to a great interest in sex, food, or other sense-satisfying topics.

sen·su·al

(sen'shū-ăl)
1. Relating to the body and the senses, as distinguished from the intellect or spirit.
2. Denoting bodily or sensory pleasure, not necessarily sexual.
[L. sensualis, endowed with feeling]

sen·su·al

(sen'shū-ăl)
1. Relating to the body and the senses, as distinguished from the intellect or spirit.
2. Denoting bodily or sensory pleasure, not necessarily sexual.
[L. sensualis, endowed with feeling]
References in periodicals archive ?
Robbed of context by the claustrophobic closeness of the camera lens, his still lifes of cacti and succulents, several of which are on view, become studies not in form, but in pure light and shadow: the angles and curves of an expressionist rather than of a sensualist.
The tetrarch is a picture of modern neurosis, a sensualist with a yearning for the moral life, his music awash in overlapping styles and shifting moods.
His aesthetic is sensualist in a way that the idealist philosopher, Cousin, would reject: "car la jouissance me parait le but de la vie, et la seule chose utile au monde" (194) ["for enjoyment seems to me to be the end of life, and the only useful thing in the world" (40)].
No longer just the headache-stricken companion to the famous author, Sophia Hawthorne emerges in Valenti's volume "on her own terms," in her multiple roles as daughter, sister, artist, friend, writer, nature-lover, playful sensualist, mother, intellectual companion, and wife (x).
Anyone who knows Lawrence's work only vaguely, who imagines that Lawrence is a pornographer and a sensualist, is in for a shock.
Here, Boyer adds, Heine's sensualist pantheism and Baudelaire's ideal of "prostitution sacree" mirror each other in the move to elevate the prostitute to the status of modern divinity.
The modern consumer, Barber writes, "is less the happy sensualist than the compulsive masturbator, a reluctant addict working at himself with little pleasure, encouraged in his labor by an ethic of infantilization that releases him to an indulgence he cannot altogether welcome" (p.
Gide is portrayed as an obsessive sensualist who enjoys cruising adolescent boys, looking them over before disappearing with them for periods of time.
Bell does not ignore sensualist thought, and gives it proper attention in the relevant contexts.
Recent research into eighteenth-century Spanish literature has repeatedly brought to light the long-ignored idea that the Enlightenment was a hotbed of sensualist, erotic and pornographic thought.
Here Klaver carefully details Kingsley's life, from his brief time as a sensualist to his reform upon meeting his future wife, his struggles with the nature and purpose of sex, his relationship with Christian socialism and the muscular Christianity of his time and place, his efforts at reform in the slums which led him along the path to Darwin, and his fight to the end for understanding, particularly his own, of what it meant to be a man of active faith and healthy desires.