sensualism


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sen·su·al·ism

(sen'shū-ăl-izm),
1. Domination by the emotions.
2. Indulgence in sensory pleasures.
[L. sensualis, endowed with feeling, fr. sentio, to feel]

sensualism

(sĕn′shū-ăl-ĭzm)
The state of being sensual, in which one's actions are dominated by the emotions.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A simple picture of a dress that covers a woman's feet to the ankles and her hand reaching down to pick up her purse near her high heels exudes the sensualism associated with A Thousand and One Nights.
Such sensualism sets him apart, at least in degree, from the other Hebrew poets of his era.
As Batchelor rightly notes of Montherlant, it was not to the "the nudism, eroticism, and general immorality propagated by the cinema and press that the sensualism of sport and the cult of the body should lead, but to the cultivation of a healthy mind in a healthy body" (xiv).
She would spend her days dressing in Marjorie's father's sumptuous costume designs, gazing at herself with a choked sensualism while her husband fluttered about, making prissy adjustments, tugging and pinning his wife like a tailor's dummy.
In his initial approach to ethics Husserl tries to solve the antitheses between Hume's ethical sensualism and Kant's ethical absolutism by subjecting both the formal and the material sphere to a comprehensive phenomenological analysis of the acts of feeling and willing (Gemutsakte).
Norman Daniel elaborates through Islam, Europe and Empire saying that these "highly coloured pictures provide inexpensive satisfaction to the deeper instincts, the murky sensualism, the unconscious masochism and sadism of the peaceful Western bourgeoisie." (29) Thus, the popularity of Montagu's Letters could be due to the description of the Eastern harems and their bath communities, but interpreting her work in terms of eroticism shows a misunderstanding of her work.
large disapproved of the excessive sensualism and supposed debauchery of
(10) Gilberto Freyre, "Brazil", subtitle: Youth and Social and Political Reform: Notwithstanding the fact that they were young and prone to sensualism of the body as well as to excesses of the mind, bachelors of arts and lawyers, educated in Europe or according to the new theories and methods, became the censors of their elders' sexual excesses, which in Brazil were a substitute, especially in the plantations, for more refined tastes or interests of an intellectual nature.
Robnik suggests that the images in Titanic, both explicitly visual and seemingly photographic, create a "sensualism that remembers social and physical mobility in terms of the proto-tactile, moving mobility of the image" (62).
'the exasperated sensualism, the learned debauchery of Petronius, the feverish inspiration of Apuleius, the amorous sighs of Tibullus.'
Recent studies of the later Enlightenment have stressed the role of British sensualism in its thinking; indeed, the later Enlightenment is sometimes presented as the triumph of British sensualism over its continental, rationalist rivals.
In his quest to embody the beautiful, he apparently seeks to sanctify his own mechanism--his erotic body--for in moments of frustration he several times discloses a tendency toward sensualism. (12) For example, when at work he hears Annie's voice, he experiences a mounting passion ordinarily subsumed in his task: "Oh, throbbing heart, be quiet!