sensory registration

sen·so·ry re·gi·stra·tion

(sen'sŏr-ē rej'is-trā'shŭn)
The brain's ability to receive input and select that which will receive attention and that which will be inhibited from consciousness.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sensory registration

The brain's ability to receive input and select that which will receive attention and that which will be inhibited from conscious attention.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Sensory modulation dysfunction, one pattern of SPD, usually includes (a) individuals who are overresponsive (i.e., hyperreactive, sensory sensitive, and sensory avoiding) and who experience sensations that most individuals perceive as benign as aversive, uncomfortable, and/or painful; (b) individuals who are underresponsive (e.g., hyporeactive, low sensory registration) and who are slow to respond or have a muted response to sensory experiences of typical intensity; and (c) individuals who are sensory cravers (e.g., sensory seekers) and who have an insatiable need for sensation beyond what is observed in typically developing individuals (Miller, Coll, & Schoen, 2007).
Rissling and Gregory A, Light, "Neurophysical Measures of Sensory Registration, Stimulus Discrimination, and Selection in Schizophrenia Patients," 284-6, in Neal R.
According to Burge, that is precisely what distinguishes representation from sensory registration. The way the individual's psychology makes the distinction is by means of formation laws implemented in, but not represented by, the individual's subsystems.
"People with autism often want sensory registration, and part of that is to be snuggled up tight."