sensory nerve


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nerve

 [nerv]
a macroscopic cordlike structure of the body, comprising a collection of nerve fibers that convey impulses between a part of the central nervous system and some other body region. See Appendix 2-6 and see color plates.

Depending on their function, nerves are known as sensory, motor, or mixed. Sensory nerves, sometimes called afferent nerves, carry information from the outside world, such as sensations of heat, cold, and pain, to the brain and spinal cord. Motor nerves, or efferent nerves, transmit impulses from the brain and spinal cord to the muscles. Mixed nerves are composed of both motor and sensory fibers, and transmit messages in both directions at once.

Together, the nerves make up the peripheral nervous system, as distinguished from the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). There are 12 pairs of cranial nerves, which carry messages to and from the brain. Spinal nerves arise from the spinal cord and pass out between the vertebrae; there are 31 pairs, 8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral, and 1 coccygeal. The various nerve fibers and cells that make up the autonomic nervous system innervate the glands, heart, blood vessels, and involuntary muscles of the internal organs.
Details of structure of components of nerve tissue.
accelerator n's the cardiac sympathetic nerves, which, when stimulated, accelerate the action of the heart.
acoustic nerve vestibulocochlear nerve; see anatomic Table of Nerves in the Appendices.
afferent nerve any nerve that transmits impulses from the periphery toward the central nervous system, such as a sensory nerve. See also neuron.
articular nerve any mixed peripheral nerve that supplies a joint and its associated structures.
auditory nerve vestibulocochlear nerve; see anatomic Table of Nerves in the Appendices.
autonomic nerve any nerve of the autonomic nervous system; called also visceral nerve.
cranial n's see cranial nerves.
cutaneous nerve any mixed peripheral nerve that supplies a region of the skin. See anatomic Table of Nerves in the Appendices.
depressor nerve
1. a nerve that lessens the activity of an organ.
2. an afferent nerve whose stimulation causes a fall in blood pressure.
efferent nerve any nerve that carries impulses from the central nervous system toward the periphery, such as a motor nerve. See also neuron.
excitor nerve one that transmits impulses resulting in an increase in functional activity.
excitoreflex nerve a visceral nerve that produces reflex action.
fusimotor n's those that innervate the intrafusal fibers of the muscle spindle.
gangliated nerve any nerve of the sympathetic nervous system.
inhibitory nerve one that transmits impulses resulting in a decrease in functional activity.
medullated nerve myelinated nerve.
mixed nerve (nerve of mixed fibers) a nerve composed of both sensory (afferent) and motor (efferent) fibers.
motor nerve a peripheral efferent nerve that stimulates muscle contraction.
myelinated nerve one whose axons are encased in a myelin sheath; called also medullated nerve.
peripheral nerve any nerve outside the central nervous system.
pilomotor n's those that supply the arrector muscles of hair.
pressor nerve an afferent nerve whose irritation stimulates a vasomotor center and increases intravascular tension.
sciatic nerve see sciatic nerve.
secretory nerve an efferent nerve whose stimulation increases vascular activity.
sensory nerve a peripheral nerve that conducts impulses from a sense organ to the spinal cord or brain. See also neuron.
somatic n's the sensory and motor nerves supplying skeletal muscle and somatic tissues.
spinal n's the 31 pairs of nerves arising from the spinal cord and passing out through the vertebrae; there are eight cervical, twelve thoracic, five lumbar, five sacral, and one coccygeal. , and see anatomic Table of Nerves in the Appendices.
Spinal nerves emerging from the spinal cord through the intervertebral foramina with muscles or muscle movements listed for specific levels. From McQuillan et al., 2002.
splanchnic n's those of the blood vessels and viscera, especially the visceral branches of the thoracic, abdominal (lumbar), and pelvic parts of the sympathetic trunks. See Appendix 3-5.
sudomotor n's those that innervate the sweat glands.
sympathetic n's
2. any nerve of the sympathetic nervous system.
trophic nerve one concerned with regulation of nutrition.
unmyelinated nerve one whose axons are not encased in a myelin sheath.
vasoconstrictor nerve one whose stimulation causes contraction of blood vessels.
vasodilator nerve one whose stimulation causes dilation of blood vessels.
vasomotor nerve one concerned in controlling the caliber of vessels, whether as a vasoconstrictor or vasodilator.
vasosensory nerve any nerve supplying sensory fibers to the vessels.
visceral nerve autonomic nerve.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sen·so·ry nerve

an afferent nerve conveying impulses that are processed by the central nervous system so as to become part of the organism's perception of self and its environment.
Synonym(s): nervus sensorius [TA]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sen·so·ry nerve

(sen'sŏr-ē nĕrv)
An afferent nerve conveying impulses that are processed by the central nervous system so as to become part of the organism's perception of self and its environment.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the presence of inflammatory chemicals in osteoarthritis synovial fluid has been known since 1959, this is the first evidence that synovial fluid can directly excite sensory nerves and hence is an important contributor to an individual's experience of pain.
Peripheral motor and sensory nerve conduction studies in normal infants and children.
Not only sensory nociceptive fibers in the walls of intra and extra cerebral vessels but also trigeminal perivascular sensory nerves innervating cerebral blood vessels play a key role in the generation and conduction of headache pain signals (13).
A number of studies, both in vivo and in vitro, have explored the diverse roles of the sensory nerve in bone physiology [6-10].
The treatment has achieved "significant results" in patients deemed suitable for the therapy which uses high frequency radio waves to target sensory nerves to relieve hip, knee, back and neck pain.
It affects one or several adjacent dorsal root ganglia and sensory nerves. Clinically it presents as painful and unilateral vesicular rash in the corresponding sensory dermatomes although rarely damage to the anterior horn cells at same level resulting in motor muscular weakness is possible.
Electrodiagnostic findings early in the disease reveal demyelinating features such as slowing of conduction velocity and prolongation of latencies but as the disease progresses secondary axonal damage commonly ensues.45 In this study after clinical examination motor and sensory nerve conduction studies sympathetic skin responses (SSR) and R-R interval variations (RRIV) were performed in chronic leprosy patients.
Orthodromic sensory nerve conduction studies of both the median and ulnar nerves and antidromic sensory nerve conduction studies in both sural nerves were also normal.
showed their clinical results on "Nerve repair by means of vein filled with muscle grafts" in 2004 and then they reviewed the literature later and described their clinical experience comparing biological and synthetic conduits for sensory nerve repair [22, 23].
At that point, each participant will undergo a biopsy of a sensory nerve in one leg to obtain his or her own Schwann cells.
co.uk or donate to www.justgiving.com/tomsdream SELECTIVE DORSAL RHIZOTOMY (SDR) SDR involves cutting some of the sensory nerve fibres that come from the muscles and enter the spinal cord.
SDR involves the sectioning, or cutting, of some of the sensory nerve fibres that come from the muscles and enter the spinal cord.