sensory deprivation


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Related to sensory deprivation: Sensory overload, Sensory deprivation tank

deprivation

 [dep-rĭ-va´shun]
loss or absence of parts, organs, powers, or things that are needed.
emotional deprivation deprivation of adequate and appropriate interpersonal or environmental experience, usually in the early developmental years.
maternal deprivation the result of premature loss or absence of the mother or of lack of proper mothering; see also maternal deprivation syndrome.
sensory deprivation a condition in which an individual receives less than normal sensory input. It can be caused by physiological, motor, or environmental disruptions. Effects include boredom, irritability, difficulty in concentrating, confusion, and inaccurate perception of sensory stimuli. Auditory and visual hallucinations and disorientation in time and place indicate perceptual distortions due to sensory deprivation. Symptoms can be produced by solitary confinement, loss of sight or hearing, paralysis, and even by ordinary hospital bed rest.
sleep deprivation a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as prolonged periods of time without sleep (sustained, natural, periodic suspension of relative consciousness).
thought deprivation blocking (def. 2).

sen·so·ry dep·ri·va·tion

diminution or absence of usual external stimuli or perceptual experiences, commonly resulting in psychological distress and aberrant functioning if continued too long.

sensory deprivation

n.
Deprivation of external sensory stimulation, as by prolonged isolation.

sensory deprivation

Etymology: L, sentire + ME, depriven, to deprive; L, atio, process
an involuntary loss of physical awareness caused by detachment from external sensory stimuli. Such deprivation often results in psychological disorders, such as panic, mental confusion, depression, and hallucinations. Sensory deprivation may be associated with various handicaps and conditions, such as blindness, heavy sedation, and prolonged isolation.

sensory deprivation

Pseudomedicine
The elimination of virtually all external auditory, sensory and visual stimuli, which can be accomplished by immersing oneself in luke-warm water in a flotation tank, or in an isolation (dry) chamber. Advocates of this form of pseudotherapy believe it to be useful for increasing self-awareness; it is also used by those who wish to enhance the intensity of meditation.

sen·so·ry dep·ri·va·tion

(sen'sŏr-ē dep'ri-vā'shŭn)
Diminution or absence of usual external stimuli or perceptual experiences, commonly resulting in psychological distress and aberrant functioning if continued too long.

sensory deprivation

The effecting of a major reduction in incoming sensory information. Sensory deprivation is damaging because the body depends for its normal functioning on constant stimulation. Sensory deprivation early in life is the most damaging of all and can lead to severe retardation and permanent malfunctioning of the deprived modality.

Sensory deprivation

A situation where an individual finds himself in an environment without sensory cues. Also, (used here) the act of shutting one's senses off to outside sensory stimuli to achieve hallucinatory experiences and/or to observe the psychological results.
Mentioned in: Hallucinations

sensory deprivation

diminution/loss of appreciation of external stimuli

deprivation, sensory

The condition produced by a loss of all or most of the stimulation from the visual, auditory, tactile and other sensory systems. Often, deprivation involves only one modality (e.g. vision). Methods used for deprivation include diffusing goggles, white noise, padded gloves, etc. Its effect has shown the necessity of continuous sensory activity to maintain the normal development and functioning of any sensory system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hebbs' work displayed the devastating impact of sensory deprivation.
By the 1950s, they were helping to conduct Cold War studies on interrogation that included experiments with sensory deprivation and hallucinogens meant to serve as "truth serum" (LSD, for example)--and developed techniques used by the CIA to torture prisoners in Latin America in the 1980s.
n Lack of light and warmth during winter months can leave us prone to sensory deprivation.
She went on to say that she 'will go on believing that offering a dog a life of sensory deprivation is crueller than killing it' and that she doesn't 'trust people who say overweight, dull-eyed dogs are perfectly happy.
Springfield Environmental Study Centre adjoining Springfield House School in Knowle was built by Variety Club Midlands in 1981 and has helped tens of thousands of children, particularly those with physical or sensory deprivation, to discover the joys of the natural world.
At Guantanamo, prisoners have been beaten, they've had lit cigarettes put out in their ears, they've had to endure false executions and sensory deprivation.
Beatings, extended isolation and restraint, public humiliation, food deprivation, sleep deprivation, forced exercise to the point of exhaustion, sensory deprivation, and lengthy maintenance of stress positions are common.
I canOt sing a note, but being in that house was a kind of sensory deprivation and by the end of it I was convinced I was brilliant.
The idea of total confinement conjures images of an environment of sensory deprivation and extreme isolation.
In Ganzfeld, 2005, a man adept at the sensory deprivation technique known as the Ganzfeld procedure reclines on a leather divan, hands crossed over his chest, eyes covered with halved Ping-Pong balls, while an overhead lamp bathes him in glowing red light.
Write to Joe, I have told my students, and get his views on surviving sensory deprivation.
The specific acts of torture, sensory deprivation, collective punishments and threats or acts of violence are clearly prohibited.