sensory deprivation


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Related to sensory deprivation: Sensory overload, Sensory deprivation tank

deprivation

 [dep-rĭ-va´shun]
loss or absence of parts, organs, powers, or things that are needed.
emotional deprivation deprivation of adequate and appropriate interpersonal or environmental experience, usually in the early developmental years.
maternal deprivation the result of premature loss or absence of the mother or of lack of proper mothering; see also maternal deprivation syndrome.
sensory deprivation a condition in which an individual receives less than normal sensory input. It can be caused by physiological, motor, or environmental disruptions. Effects include boredom, irritability, difficulty in concentrating, confusion, and inaccurate perception of sensory stimuli. Auditory and visual hallucinations and disorientation in time and place indicate perceptual distortions due to sensory deprivation. Symptoms can be produced by solitary confinement, loss of sight or hearing, paralysis, and even by ordinary hospital bed rest.
sleep deprivation a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as prolonged periods of time without sleep (sustained, natural, periodic suspension of relative consciousness).
thought deprivation blocking (def. 2).

sen·so·ry dep·ri·va·tion

diminution or absence of usual external stimuli or perceptual experiences, commonly resulting in psychological distress and aberrant functioning if continued too long.

sensory deprivation

n.
Deprivation of external sensory stimulation, as by prolonged isolation.

sensory deprivation

Etymology: L, sentire + ME, depriven, to deprive; L, atio, process
an involuntary loss of physical awareness caused by detachment from external sensory stimuli. Such deprivation often results in psychological disorders, such as panic, mental confusion, depression, and hallucinations. Sensory deprivation may be associated with various handicaps and conditions, such as blindness, heavy sedation, and prolonged isolation.

sensory deprivation

Pseudomedicine
The elimination of virtually all external auditory, sensory and visual stimuli, which can be accomplished by immersing oneself in luke-warm water in a flotation tank, or in an isolation (dry) chamber. Advocates of this form of pseudotherapy believe it to be useful for increasing self-awareness; it is also used by those who wish to enhance the intensity of meditation.

sen·so·ry dep·ri·va·tion

(sen'sŏr-ē dep'ri-vā'shŭn)
Diminution or absence of usual external stimuli or perceptual experiences, commonly resulting in psychological distress and aberrant functioning if continued too long.

sensory deprivation

The effecting of a major reduction in incoming sensory information. Sensory deprivation is damaging because the body depends for its normal functioning on constant stimulation. Sensory deprivation early in life is the most damaging of all and can lead to severe retardation and permanent malfunctioning of the deprived modality.

Sensory deprivation

A situation where an individual finds himself in an environment without sensory cues. Also, (used here) the act of shutting one's senses off to outside sensory stimuli to achieve hallucinatory experiences and/or to observe the psychological results.
Mentioned in: Hallucinations

sensory deprivation

diminution/loss of appreciation of external stimuli

deprivation, sensory

The condition produced by a loss of all or most of the stimulation from the visual, auditory, tactile and other sensory systems. Often, deprivation involves only one modality (e.g. vision). Methods used for deprivation include diffusing goggles, white noise, padded gloves, etc. Its effect has shown the necessity of continuous sensory activity to maintain the normal development and functioning of any sensory system.
References in periodicals archive ?
So what makes sensory deprivation "cruel and unusual" to some but a source of energy and relaxation to others?
Zubek was once asked his opinion of those who take sensory deprivation research and apply it to brainwashing or other mind-control techniques.
He provides a useful history of CIA and military experiments with hypnosis, sleep deprivation, sensory deprivation, electroshock, and drugs in coercive interrogations via ethically challenged programs (Project Chatter in 1949, Project Bluebird in 1950, Artichoke in 1951, and MKULTRA in 1953), often upon unwitting human subjects, in an attempt to find a "brainwashing" mechanism.
On this view, the category of torture lite would include the use of sensory deprivation techniques (including hooding and loud "white noise"), random and extreme variation of temperature (often combined with nakedness), disorientation in terms of time and place (by making it impossible to keep track of time and by moving the victim around unexpectedly and randomly), solitary confinement, and moderate sleep deprivation (enough to disorient without becoming agonizing).
Massachusetts is putting seriously disturbed prisoners in sensory deprivation cells where they sit 23 hours a day for years," Ms.
We think they need a quiet room and a still bed, but that is actually sensory deprivation for babies .
Other conditions to include in a differential diagnosis, particularly if head banging begins suddenly, are otitis media, migraine, sensory deprivation, blindness, deafness, and central nervous system diseases that include head banging as a symptom.
WELL, POST POLICY WOULD BE TO PUT YOU IN THE SENSORY DEPRIVATION CHAMBER UNDER JEANINE'S DESK WITH THIS BOX OF BITTER AND DISILLUSIONED IGUANAS.
Deeply upsetting but never gratuitous, these scenes, and discussions of how the military and CIA use the most inhumane forms of sensory deprivation and humiliation, are backed up by interviews, all superbly edited by Sloane Klevin.
Sensory deprivation in a session entitled "Dialogue in the Dark" will challenge participants' communications skills and allow an examination of how various senses are used to foster understanding and collaboration.
By the 1950s, they were helping to conduct Cold War studies on interrogation that included experiments with sensory deprivation and hallucinogens meant to serve as "truth serum" (LSD, for example)--and developed techniques used by the CIA to torture prisoners in Latin America in the 1980s.
She went on to say that she 'will go on believing that offering a dog a life of sensory deprivation is crueller than killing it' and that she doesn't 'trust people who say overweight, dull-eyed dogs are perfectly happy.