sensation


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sensation

 [sen-sa´shun]
an impression produced by impulses conveyed by an afferent nerve to the sensorium.
girdle sensation zonesthesia.
gnostic s's sensations perceived by the more recently developed senses, such as those of light touch and the epicritic sensibility to muscle, joint, and tendon vibrations.
primary sensation that resulting immediately and directly from application of a stimulus.
referred sensation (reflex sensation) one felt elsewhere than at the site of application of a stimulus.
subjective sensation one originating with the organism and not occurring in response to an external stimulus.

sen·sa·tion

(sen-sā'shŭn),
A feeling; the translation into consciousness of the effects of a stimulus exciting any of the organs of sense.
[L. sensatio, perception, feeling, fr. sentio, to perceive, feel]

sensation

/sen·sa·tion/ (sen-sa´shun) an impression produced by impulses conveyed by an afferent nerve to the sensorium.
girdle sensation  zonesthesia.
referred sensation , reflex sensation one felt elsewhere than at the site of application of a stimulus.
subjective sensation  one perceptible only to the subject, and not connected with any object external to the body.

sensation

(sĕn-sā′shən)
n.
a. A perception associated with stimulation of a sense organ or with a specific body condition: the sensation of heat; a visual sensation.
b. The faculty to feel or perceive; physical sensibility: The patient has very little sensation left in the right leg.
c. An indefinite generalized body feeling: a sensation of lightness.

sensation

[sensā′shən]
Etymology: L, sentire, to feel
1 a feeling, impression, or awareness of a body state or condition that results from the stimulation of a sensory receptor site and transmission of the nerve impulse along an afferent fiber to the brain. Kinds of sensation include delayed sensation, epigastric sensation, primary sensation, referred sensation, and subjective sensation.
2 a feeling or an awareness of a mental or emotional state, which may or may not result in response to an external stimulus.
enlarge picture
Pathways of sensation

sensation

Homeopathy
A general term for the quality of a symptom; for example, a pain can be burning, throbbing, tearing and so on.

Mainstream medicine
The conscious recognition of a physical (audio, chemical, electrical, mechanical, visual) stimulation that excites a sense organ.

Psychology
The mental and emotional experience associated with a sound, light or other simple stimulus, and the initial information-processing steps by which sense organs and neural pathways receive stimulus information from the environment.

sensation

Mainstream medicine The conscious recognition of a physical–audio, chemical, electrical, mechanical, visual stimulation which excites a sense organ. See Epicritic sensation.

sen·sa·tion

(sen-sā'shŭn)
A feeling; the translation into consciousness of the effects of a stimulus exciting any of the organs of sense.
[L. sensatio, perception, feeling, fr. sentio, to perceive, feel]

sensation

The conscious experience produced by the stimulation of any sense organ such as the eye, ear, nose, tongue, skin, or any internal sensory receptor.

sensation

central nervous system translation of incoming sensory stimuli into conscious awareness

sensation 

The conscious response to the effect of a stimulus exciting any sense organ. See perception.

sen·sa·tion

(sen-sā'shŭn)
A feeling; translation into consciousness of effects of a stimulus exciting any of the organs of sense.
[L. sensatio, perception, feeling, fr. sentio, to perceive, feel]

sensation (sensā´shən),

n an impression conveyed by an afferent nerve to the sensorium commune.
sensation, psychologic effects of,
n an arousal, facilitation, and distortion of sensation by psychologic factors, the basis for which lies in the corticalization of the special senses.
sensation, referred,
n a group of vaguely classified sensations that are a consequence of cortical experience. They are the sensory hallucinations,
paresthesias, and the phenomenon called
phantom limb. Nonspecific and poorly localized pain in the alveolar ridges, which have poor vascular supply, may be evidence of this phantom limb phenomenon associated with neurotic behavior.
sensation, specialized,
n a sensation that is perceived by the specialized end organs associated with special senses such as vision, hearing, and smell.

sensation

an impression produced by impulses conveyed by an afferent nerve to the sensorium. Includes cold, distention, hunger, itch, pain, taste of various kinds, thermal, thirst, tickle, touch, warmth and some psychological and emotional experiences which animals obviously experience but cannot describe. See also sense.

sensation disturbance
cutaneous sensation errors include paresthesia, hyperesthesia, anesthesia. See also blindness, deafness.

Patient discussion about sensation

Q. What causes a warm sensation in your foot I have a warm sensation at sole of left foot lasting 5-10 second From time to time I get a warm sensation at the sole of my foot lasting about 5-10 seconds. Started about 2 months ago.

A. Frankly? Although it's tempting to try to give you diagnosis here, these kinds of complaints are so varied and can point to so many different directions I would refrain from doing it. In my opinion you should see a doctor. It's impossible to give a diagnosis based on one line. Sorry...

More discussions about sensation
References in periodicals archive ?
Generally, in interior sound of the vehicle, the pleasant sensation tends to be decreased when the powerful sensation increases.
Subjective sensation and comfort measurements should ideally be coupled with documentation of physiological responses to the thermal environments.
Now, that level of service is available with the AT&T connected Sensation 3G medical and health smartwatch, said Bob Wagner, CEO of OneMedia.
However, previous research findings and the author's observation suggest that pathological Internet users are heterogeneous who act very differently online, who perceived the Internet differently, and who may be more sensation seeking or disinherited than normal users.
Critique: The newest addition to the outstanding 'Imagery and Human Development' series from Baywood Press, "On the Evolution of Conscious Sensation, Conscious Imagination, and Consciousness of Self" is an erudite and thought-provoking treatise that will be of special interest to students of psychology, philosophy, cognitive science, and neuroscience.
An additional 24 experts were identified as the corresponding authors of peer-reviewed published papers on alcohol use, sensation seeking, and risky sexual behaviour in medical databases such as PubMed.
Shoe Sensation has been a community-focused retailer of branded footwear for the entire family since 1984.
1) This syndrome consists of shoulder pain, a loss of sensation, a reduced range of motion, and anatomic deformities such as scapular flaring and shoulder droop.
Study of how the components of sensation seeking(adventure, experience seeking, escape from inhibition, boredom susceptibility and) and defence styles(mature, immature and neurotic) relate to aggression.
Thanks to the innovative Crisp Sensation technology, the products score with a superior crumb and a core that remains juicy and tender.
After 14 years of indoor successes with Sensation, it is a fantastic experience organising the very first outdoor edition against the backdrop of Dubai," said founder Duncan Stutterheim.
The sensation patterns were, however, consistent across different West European and East Asian cultures, highlighting that emotions and their corresponding bodily sensation patterns have a biological basis.