sensate focus


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sensate focus

An area, such as an erogenous zone, that is particularly sensitive to tactile stimulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Masters and Johnson never used the term "mindfulness" when describing sensate focus, it is evident that sensate focus relies on many of the features of mindfulness meditation with its focus on paying attention to sensation in the here and now, and reducing the tendency toward spectatoring (evaluating and monitoring one's own performance) and anxious anticipation.
(24.) As Maier explains, the term "sensate focus" refers to
The benefits of sensate focus include, discovering new types of touch, spine-tingling sensations, increased comfort with physical intimacy, better awareness of your lover's body, as well as your own.
Gestalt awareness exercises, sensate focus, psychodrama, mirror work, etc.) that help them become more aware of their bodies.
Practise sensate focus exercises where one partner gives a massage while the other partner says what feels good and makes requests, for example saying "lighter" or "faster".
The most important principle of sensate focus involves helping the client or couple to develop a heightened awareness of, and to focus on, sensations rather than performance (Wincze & Carey, 1991).
Modifying sensate focus for use with Haredi (Ultra-Orthodox) Jewish couples.
The work of Masters and Johnson (1970) helped to popularize the technique of sensate focus to help women enjoy the pleasure of being touched while overcoming the need to reciprocate (Apfelbaum, 1995).
In a section called "Phallocentrism Redux," Tiefer takes on the continued "sensate focus" of much sex therapy, contrasting it with a feminist research emphasis on sexual difficulties of an entirely different order from those that "focus exercises" can treat -- familiar everyday problems like "partner chooses inconvenient time, inability to relax, too little foreplay, too little tenderness." In response to the orchestrated attack from within sexology on Shere Hite's research methods, Tiefer almost uncritically endorses Hite's findings, declaring that, however they were arrived at, they offer access to alternative knowledge about women's sexual experience as we live it.
In addition to psychological therapies (mindfulness), behavioral therapies (sensate focus), and cognitive-behavioral therapies (CBTs), a range of pharmacologic agents have been or are currently being used, often off-label, in the management of HSDD in women.
Sex therapists use a technique called sensate focus to help men with performance anxiety.
Coble (1997) recommended that a sexuality manual capable of truly addressing the needs of a physically disabled population, should include discussions of specific and diverse disabilities, a wide range of possible sex acts (including non-physical acts, such as gazing and fantasy-sharing), concrete practical suggestions, alternatives to traditional sensate focus, and privacy.