senility


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senility

 [sĕ-nil´ĭ-te]
an obsolete and imprecise term used to denote a pronounced loss of mental or physical control in the aged. Certain types of psychosis are associated with aging, such as senile dementia and dementia of the alzheimer type.

se·nil·i·ty

(se-nil'i-tē), Negative and pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
1. Old age.
2. General term for a variety of organic disorders, both physical and mental, occurring in old age.
[see senile]

senility

/se·nil·i·ty/ (sĕ-nil´ĭ-te) the physical and mental deterioration associated with old age.

senility

[sinil′itē]
Etymology: L, senilis, aged
the general state of reduced mental and physical vigor associated with aging.

senility

Geriatrics A state of advanced physical and mental deterioration associated with advanced age. See Dementia, Geriatrics, Senile dementia.

se·nil·i·ty

(sĕ-nil'i-tē)
Old age; a general term for a variety of conditions seen in mental disorders occurring in old age, broken down into two broad categories, organic and psychological.
See also: senile

senility

Old age, usually with the connotation of mental or physical deterioration. From the Latin senilis , old (which had no negative significance).

senility

physiological and psychological processes characteristic of old age

se·nil·i·ty

(sĕ-nil'i-tē) Negative and pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
1. Old age.
2. General term for a variety of organic disorders, both physical and mental, occurring in old age.

senility (sənil´itē),

n a term usually used to describe the cognitive and physiologic signs of advancing age.
References in periodicals archive ?
Exercise would be another good defense against senility, but I've not gotten much of it lately.
Self, Senility and Alzheimer's Disease in Modern America
His off-the-wall comments aren't a recent development brought about by increasing senility.
Finley's act had the moth-eaten aspect of cultural senility.
Research published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease suggests that consuming apples and apple juice may protect the brain from age-related memory loss such as Alzheimer's disease and senility.
Grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway, the good fortune to run into the ones I do, and the eyesight to tell the difference.
Much has been made of Yasser Arafat's stubborn refusal to take a good deal in the final push for a comprehensive Middle East peace, and Clinton shows the Palestinian leader to be not only foolish but possibly on the verge of senility.
The Seven Ages of Man report borrows from Shakespeare's famous 'All the World's A Stage' soliloquy describing man's journey from infancy to senility.
While the core cast was composed mainly of young people caught up in the excitement of their first film, the producers had savvily cast veteran actress Yoshie Minami, then 84, in the role of a former starlet walking the tightrope of senility in a lonely country house.
Both were suffering from some degree of senility and were found dead after being cut off.
I am not inclined to research but have seen the results of folic acid given to patients, resulting in gratifying remissions in postpartum psychosis, senility, breast adenoma, cervical dysplasia, and weakness with "wobbly legs.