senesce

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senesce

(sə-nĕs′)
intr.v. se·nesced, se·nescing, se·nesces
1. To grow old; age.
2. To stop dividing, as certain cells.
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hilaris egg masses, nymphs, and adults on mimosa over time in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2017, and 2018, and percentage of senesced pods over time in mimosa in 2017 and 2018.
This increase is consistent with the return of organic matter alleviating acidity due to the growth of annual pastures and the return of senesced or trampled plant material to the soil surface.
Proportion of other grasses and forbs along with higher air temperatures during stockpile and lower air temperatures in December 2011 may explain that reduction in tall fescue proportion and the patterns of senesced herbage observed during winter grazing in 20112012.
Mature rhizomes included those that were currently elongating with actively growing scales and those with yellow hardened stem tissue and senesced scales that were associated with actively growing tillers.
During each passage, if the cultures were highly proliferative, each well or plate of cells was expanded into 4 other wells-plates; if they had a low level of proliferation, they were only expanded to 2 others; if they were not proliferating, they were necessarily passaged undiluted from one well to another until the cells senesced. The denominator of the cell immediately inferior indicates the ratio at which the cells were split.
The last harvest (or the one harvest of single-harvest systems) takes place in the fall after the plants have senesced. During senescence, most nutrients, including nitrogen, likely retranslocate to the roots, becoming available for next year's growth.
The population was revisited during the morning and evening on 12 and 13 July, at which point the flowers had completely senesced. I then removed the bags.
Senesced goldenrods with galls were retrieved along six parallel transects located 0-50 m from the forest edge in a dense stand of goldenrod in Lumpkin Co., GA, during March, 2007.
Similarly, the annual decomposition of senesced litter has considerable impact on each of these strata (Carpenter and Lodge 1986) and in many wetlands litter exceeds biomass.
It is also possible that the return of crop above-ground residues, particularly senesced leaves in the post-flowering period, was involved.
The leaf N/P quotient was evaluated from the senesced leaves of 11 dominant tree species from the mature forest.