glide

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glide

(glīd),
A smooth, or effortless, continuous movement.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

glide

1. To move in a smooth, virtually frictionless manner.
2. Movement in a smooth, virtually frictionless manner.
3. A joint mobilization technique in which the clinician applies a force to move bones in a direction parallel to the treatment plane. This technique is used to maintain or increase joint play.
4. The smooth movement of acoustic frequencies, e.g., in audible speech.

mandibular glide

The movement of the mandible in any direction as the teeth come into contact.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

glide

(glīd)
Smooth or effortless continuous movement.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
"Permit Onglides"--Complex onsets are allowed if the second consonant of the cluster is a semivowel (Cw/j).
In post-war sources (CDG 1966; LL s.a.) the last component of the triphthong uoi was partially interpreted as the semivowel j (uoj).
Rising diphthong begins with a less prominent semivowel and end with a more prominent full vowel.
The fact that several verbs have present and past stems undistinguished (e.g., da-dam- "blow," and, perhaps, some of the stems listed above) suggests that the Middle West Iranian formant -id- or -ad- has been reduced to semivowels and then absorbed into the past stem.
[f[epsilon]r-[.sup.1]g[epsilon]-s[??]n] [f[epsilon][??].[.sup.1]g[epsilon].s[??]n] The left transcription similarly prescribes an apical, consonantal [r] in the unstressed first syllable, rather than the dark-schwa off-glide (or semivowel) of a diphthong.
Also, references concern Luick's account of the evolution of the cluster <sc> (179), fates of the velars (180-182), palatalisations (185), critical evaluation of Luick's account of the evolution of the semivowel [j] (189), shift of the yogh to [hi (191), and consonant gemination (203-204).
The available evidence testifying presumably to the application of the rule in Old English is limited to virtually two cases, namely, genitive plural forms of i-stem nouns: Deni(g)a (< *dani) 'Dane' and wini(g)(e)a < (*wini) 'friend', both forms lacking the expected gemination of the nasal and preserving instead the palatal semivowel (Erdman 1972: 409).
Falling diphthong (first-vowel syllabic) in a stressed syllable or monosyllable, ending with a dolce semivowel.
The classification below groups these verbs according to the root vowel and the presence or absence in the preterite of the semivowel [j] in word-initial position (unless indicated otherwise, all forms are singular): (3) a.
6.1.77--essentially, the "semivowel sandhi rule"), the element aci 'when a vowel follows' sets the rule's righthand condition; that element, never repeated, is to be presumed for each of the immediately following fifteen or so rules--which, of course, no longer "follow" in the Kaumudi.
In one and the same morpheme a semivowel [j] is sometimes reported before [e, [euro]], sometimes not (examples of both on p.
The syllable is normally divided into onset (consonant, consonant cluster, semiconsonant, or nonexistent), nucleus (syllabic vowel or, rarely, vocal consonant), and coda (consonant, consonant cluster, or semivowel).