semantics

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semantics

 [sĕ-man´tiks]
study of the meanings of words and the rules of their use; study of the relation between language and significance.

se·man·tics

(sĕ-man'tiks), A branch of semiotics:
1. The study of the significance and development of the meaning of words.
2. The study concerned with the relations between signs and their referents; the relations between the signs of a system; and human behavioral reaction to signs, including unconscious attitudes, influences of social institutions, and epistemologic and linguistic assumptions.
[G. sēmainō, to show]

se·man·tics

(sĕ-man'tiks)
1. Study of the significance and development of the meaning of words.
2. The study concerned with the relations between signs and their referents.
[G. sēmainō, to show]

semantics

The study of meaning, of the effectiveness with which thought is translated into language, and of the relationship between words and symbols and meaning.
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, according to semanticist explanations we should reduce the meaning of the sentence uttered to, and just to, its literal content.
Some semanticists, including Davidson himself, hope to construe it materially; but this, notoriously, appears to render knowing what is the case if u is true insufficient for apprehending the thought expressed.
These are some examples of people who are not semanticists. To such people, as well as to a large number of other over-verbalized people in our culture who are not only confusing themselves but making confusion epidemic, the semanticist can only say,' What are you talking about?' The fact that this question practically never receives a serious answer indicates the magnitude of the task before us.
The first is that provided by the work of general semanticists. This area is of special interest in undertaking explorations in language, since general semantics is concerned with the relationships among language, thought, and human behavior.
Although the concept of a Vulcan mind meld has continued to be a futuristic dream in the cultural consciousness, the conceptual notion of moving information in and out across space and time in nothing new to general semanticists; for the idea lies at the heart of Korzybski's theoretical model of human thought.
This month there gathered at Columbia University an abstraction of general semanticists whose purpose was to discuss the subject of research.
To help GS continue its run as a relevant and practical system for constructive human time-binding, general semanticists would be well advised to probe and identify barriers and opportunities to expand the scope and influence of GS in the world at large and in targeted areas as we zip into the future.
The article will show that through the application of what general semanticists refer to as "extensional devices," listening can become a less abstract and more manageable skill set, which will allow us to perform better the basic operations that fall under the abstract heading of "listening." To accomplish this, the article will first examine the literature arising from the field of interpersonal communication regarding listening.
For this effort, semanticists should receive nothing but praise.
general semanticists, even though they represented a number of
Word, therefore, for Korzybski and the general semanticists who followed him, already and always does not accommodate the reality in its totality.
Excellent semantic observations have also been contributed by social psychologists and students of propaganda (Lasswell, Doob, etc.), by psychologists (Piaget, Koffka, etc.), while the literature of psychoanalysis is crowded with information about human linguistic and symbolic functioning that must eventually be understood by semanticists and absorbed into their discipline.

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