semantic interference

semantic interference

Anything that blocks the acquisition, recall, or retention of words.
References in periodicals archive ?
One must also acknowledge that that there is an element of semantic interference which may account for disruption of attentional selectivity during serial recall.
In its current formulation, the RHM does not explain how the degree of similarity could modulate the effect of semantic interference. Moreover, we have just reviewed some translation recognition data that are not always consistent with the model's predictions (see Brysbaert & Duyk, 2010 for other limitations of the RHM and Kroll, van Hell, Tokowicz, & Green, 2010 for a reply).
Moreover, a recent version of the DRM could also explain why nonproficient bilinguals would not show evidence of semantic interference effects when translating form L2 to L1.
The semantic interference effect evident in the Lag 3 condition replicates other results reported in the literature which indicate that name retrieval involves competition from other exemplars from the same semantic category (e.g.
Either it is the case that any bias against repetition is stronger for Lag 3 repetition (which seems unlikely, and does not fit the Lag 3 semantic interference effects), or else we need to acknowledge that, despite any such bias, the data are still inconsistent with the suggestion that representations undergo a brief period of self-inhibition.
The results showed a semantic interference effect, that is, pronominal naming latencies were slower in the context of distractor words semantically related to the picture than in the context of semantically unrelated words.
T-tests analyses revealed that the semantic interference effect was significant in both kind of utterances (Full Noun: ti (29) = 2.51; p < .02; t2 (31) = 3.13; p < .01; Pronoun: (tl (29) = 2.47; p < .03; t (31) = 2.44; p < .03).
Semantic interference and orthographic facilitation in definition naming.
Lexical selection processes have been explored by investigating semantic interference in priming and stroop-like interference paradigms (Alario, Segui, & Ferrand, 2000; Cutting & Ferreira, 1998; Starreveld & La Heij, 1996).
Therefore, the results of this analysis indicated that semantic interference appeared when the prime was a word, but not when the prime was a picture.
Masked priming was used to study the locus of the semantic interference effect.
Although the semantic explanation can account for many of the semantic interference and phonological facilitation effects (see Glaser & Glaser, 1989; and Rayner & Springer, 1986), it has run into difficulties because a number of experiments have shown that semantic interference is reduced and may even disappear whenever the task used does not require a naming response (Humphreys et al., 1995; Schriefers, Meyer, & Levelt, 1990).
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