semantic dementia


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semantic dementia

A subtype of frontotemporal lobar degeneration characterised by specific loss of comprehension of language and impaired facial and object recognition; memory is relatively preserved in the early stages of disease.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

semantic dementia

Any of a group of brain disorders marked by nearly complete losses in the understanding of word meanings, spelling, and the identification or recognition of facts, faces, or objects. The disease is marked pathologically by local atrophy in the neocortex of the temporal lobe of the brain.
See also: dementia
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Semantic-episodic memory interactions in semantic dementia: implications for retrograde memory function.
Semantic knowledge and episodic memory for faces in semantic dementia. Neuropsychol 1996; 15:101-14.
Episodic memory: New insights from the study of semantic dementia. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 9, 245-250.
Neary, "Distinct behavioural profiles in frontotemporal dementia and semantic dementia," Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, vol.
Reversal of the concreteness effect in semantic dementia. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 26, 568-579.
Later, this condition was also described by Snowden et al (3) as semantic dementia (SD).
According to the boffins, those with a specific type of dementia, called semantic dementia, face such a problem, reports Live Science.
Other conditions that have gathered under the umbrella of FTD during the last decade include frontotemporal lobar degeneration, progressive nonfluent aphasia, semantic dementia, motor neuron inclusion dementia, and cortical-basal degeneration, Dr.
Similarly, neurodegenerative diseases involving different lesion patterns in the temporal lobe such as AD and semantic dementia were compared in terms of performances in AbM and PS, confirming different patterns of deficit (e.g., [13, 26-29]), namely, relatively preserved performance in PS for the remote periods in AD and in episodic AbM for the recent period in SD.
For example, researchers have compared the performance on semantic processing tasks with varying task demands between people with semantic dementia (SD) and those with stroke-based aphasia (e.g., [97, 123, 124]).

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