seltzer water

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Sel·ters wa·ter

, Seltzer water
a mineral water containing carbonates of sodium, calcium, and magnesium, and chloride of sodium.
[Nieder Selters, a mineral spring in Prussia]

seltzer water

1. Naturally occurring water with a high mineral and carbon dioxide content.
2. Soda water.
See also: water
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Chris Wragge, Larry Scott, Bobby & Margie Emden, Gale Sitomer, Michael Bolton, Scott Seltzer
Sitting in the fridge or in a cooler for a spring/summer party, Spiked Seltzer "does not have a flavor profile that suggests it's just for women or men.
Seltzer, for the uninitiated, is carbonated water plus flavorings.
The crux of the matter, however, seems to be that Seltzer was not careful about the request for exclusivity and ultimately got only what he asked for -- not what Seltzer may have thought he bargained for and definitely not what Seltzer wanted which was a lack of competition under the KashwA(c)re brand in Japan.
NYSE: NLS), a leader in innovative home fitness equipment, has selected The Seltzer Licensing Group to develop strategic licensing programs and new partnerships for the Nautilus([R]) and Bowflex([R]) brands.
Seltzer said: "The children who got to interact with their mothers had virtually the same hormonal response, whether they interacted in person or over the phone.
Said to cure all sorts of diseases, from the common cold to tuberculosis, seltzer was touted in an 1835 New York Times ad for "travelers .
While commentators elsewhere in the country were condemning Seltzer for deceit and betrayal, the intellectuals of Eugene have been circling their academic wagons around her.
One of the biggest champions of the books was The New York Times, who not only gave the book a rave review courtesy of Michiko Kakutani, but also profiled Seltzer in the House & Home section.
With the Soda-Club soda maker, seltzer can be made in 30 seconds with the push of a button, the company said.
Directed, written by Jason Friedberg, Aaron Seltzer.
In his new book, Seltzer continues unpacking the bloody "wound culture" that he investigated in his earlier work, Serial Killers.