self-reproach


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self-reproach

(sĕlf′rĭ-prōch′)
n.
The act or an instance of charging oneself with a fault or mistake.

self′-re·proach′ful adj.
self′-re·proach′ful·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
In aiming the first gun fired against the rebellion I had no feeling of self-reproach, for I fully believed that the contest was inevitable, and was not of our seeking," he wrote.
ANYWAY, I also survived a stewards' on the John Smith's Cup and got the verdict in a good few photo-finishes, but my favourite stroke of fortune came when I needed a 'boredom bet' in the Prix Jean Prat, had an ill-advised 50 quid on Hearts Of Fire, watched the race in a fit of self-reproach, and then returned to my computer to find I'd hit the wrong button and had an ill-gotten 400 notes nestling shamefacedly in my account.
He embarrassedly describes his financial woes to his benefactor Antonio (an excellent Byron Jennings, who nicely underplays his character's crush on the younger man) with such self-reproach that Antonio's generous response becomes the obvious course of action.
H3c: The depression quadrant will have the highest score on self-reproach
Imagine if every time we thought something negative about others there was no self-reproach, but that for a breath of silence we chose to see the spirit that flows through us all reflected in that person.
Pregnancy termination is irreversible," she writes, "and if women are unable to come to terms with an abortion that evokes considerable guilt, the negative feelings may lead to more generalized feelings of self-reproach and/or they may cause the individual to engage in negative behaviors targeted towards one's partner.
If that doesn't get you, you're bound to be washed away by the great puddles of self-reproach that arrive the next morning, when you remember everything you've done.
When the war ended, our people, in deep self-reproach that this kind of war should never occur again, firmly resolved to tread the road of peace.
Froula wants us to read her thwarted appetites, envy, self-pity, and self-reproach as markers of what Keynes in effect predicted would be the result of Germany's "humiliated and downtrodden" (109) state.
It is hard to miss a note of self-reproach in the stinging and famous denunciation Hemingway writes for Helen Gordon, who mourns her violated Catholic principles and dismisses her philandering husband with her ultimate insult, "You writer" (THHN 186).
Closely related to the language of self-disparagement is a style of speaking which we may call the "language of self-reproach.
Feelings of worthlessness, guilt, and self-reproach