self-replicating

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self-replicating

(sĕlf′rĕp′lĭ-kā′tĭng)
adj.
Replicating oneself or itself: self-replicating cells.

self′-rep′li·ca′tion n.
References in periodicals archive ?
As I show in Signature in the Cell, even the extremely limited capacity for RNA self-replication that has been demonstrated depends critically on the specificity of the arrangement of nucleotide bases--that is, upon preexisting sequence-specific information.
DNA: A nucleic acid that carries the genetic information in the cell and is capable of self-replication and synthesis of RNA.
A longtime campaigner to protect seed diversity, Mooney has led ETC to call for a moratorium on all research involving molecular self-assembly and self-replication.
This special property for accurate self-replication allows DNA to duplicate the genes of an organism during the nuclear divisions for growth and the production of germ cells for the next generation.
A meme is a social, cultural, intellectual, or even religious unit of ideas that resembles the gene in the processes of self-replication, natural selection and evolution it undergoes.
His research interests include: nanomedicine, medical nanorobotics design, molecular machine systems, diamondoid mechanosynthesis (theory and experimental pathways), molecular assemblers and nanofactories, and self-replication in machine and factory systems.
Unlike infectious malicious programs such as viruses, such Trojan horse codes do not propagate by self-replication but instead rely on the exploitation of an end-user.
9) According to the RNA World Hypothesis, the first living system was a polymer(s) of catalytic RNA capable of self-replication that subsequently evolved the ability to encode more versatile peptide catalysts.
So far, however, Hyde's efforts at self-replication, which Gauld has headed, have been rocky.
These latter cells, although they are not autologous, have clearly shown the features of nearly limitless "youthful" self-replication, and also have demonstrated significant potential for both cardiovascular and neurologic therapy, among many other possibilities.
These latter ceils, although they are not autologous, have clearly shown the features of nearly limitless "youthful" self-replication, and also have demonstrated significant potential for both cardiovascular and neurologic therapy, among many other possibilities.
Second, it worries about the danger of uncontrollable self-replication by nanotech automatons.