self-reflection

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self-reflection

(sĕlf′rĭ-flĕk′shən)
n.
Self-examination; introspection.

self′-re·flec′tive adj.
self′-re·flec′tive·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
13) But in self-reflectively disclosing their own detachment from a fixed, auratic horizon, Atget's images call into question the very fixity and consistency of the aura against which they purportedly give evidence and thus orient themselves.
She self-reflectively dreams of a friend who was deported, "dressed in rags, her face thin and worn.
Elderly, long-married couple Agnes (Penelope Wilton) and Tobias (Tim Pigott-Smith), as sedately well-oiled as they are well-heeled, bask self-reflectively in the luxury of idleness.
4) The following analysis, however, will show that this story not only echoes Dings feminist concerns in her other early works but also self-reflectively questions the apparently unified interpretation of female subjectivity in Chinese intellectual discourse in the 1920s.
Ken Stuckey, of Bentley University, self-reflectively uses the examples of two of his teaching activities, a "Read-In and Write-In," and a "Bring a Friend to Class Day," in order to illustrate what it is like to teach and learn from the point of passion, and by his own example (i.
The enclosed little figure peers out self-reflectively from the milky overlays of glass probably unable to be heard if he was ever moved to share his thoughts with us verbally.
Not so long ago, painful coming-out stories rife with unrequited love for bi-curious (and ultimately straight) friends proliferated in lesbian storytelling, but now queer filmmakers are self-reflectively questioning toleplaying, lesbian sex and even sex with men.
be attempted either self-reflectively, within the field of art, or
Eloisa's rhetoric is controlled by the images that she evokes and that are evoked in her by language self-reflectively.
The "moral" that the author draws in the final section of the chapter points self-reflectively back to the activity of the Hispanist critic in the drama of determining meanings, truth and value.
7) A reader might not tolerate the excessively tragic brand of optimism Bernstein essays in "Artifice of Absorption," but I think that she would be hard pressed to deny the critical force and poise of a verse essay about antiabsorptive writing that self-reflectively, uses form to sustain an antiabsorptive lexical register.
Terkel obviously sets people at ease, inducing them to speak at length and self-reflectively.