self-pollination


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Related to self-pollination: cross-pollination
Self-incompatibilityclick for a larger image
Fig. 279 Self-incompatibility . The process depicted results in the progeny being S 1 /S3 and S2 /S3.

self-pollination

the transfer of pollen from the stamen of a flower either to the stigma of the same flower or to another flower on the same plant. Since self-pollination leads to self-fertilization which is a form of inbreeding, many plants have developed mechanisms to prevent its occurrence. For example, plants can be DIOECIOUS, show SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY, and have differential maturation times of male and female floral organs on the same plants (for example, see ARUM LILY). Compare CROSS-POLLINATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Treatment Number of Number of % flowers fruits formed Hand cross-pollination 54 30 55.55 a Hand self-pollination 65 2 3.27 c Spontaneous self-pollination 35 0 0.00 d Control--open pollination 145 46 31.50 b Index of Self-Incompatibility (ISI) 0.06 Reproductive Efficacy (RE) of 0.57 Pollinators Different letters in the same column indicate significant differences at P < 0.05--Fisher's exact test.
The high fruit production in treatments with spontaneous self-pollination and manual self-pollination confirms that 'Bordo' cv.
In the natural population of that species, no difference was observed between the fruit set resulting from spontaneous self-pollination and the one resulting from open pollination ([greater than or equal to] 92.2%; Table 1).
Flowers within a plant were assigned to the following treatments: (1) agamospermy (flowers had their stigma removed at the beginning of anthesis); (2) autonomous self-pollination (un-manipulated bagged flowers); (3) hand self-pollination (flowers hand-pollinated with their own pollen); (4) hand cross-pollination (previously emasculated flowers hand-pollinated with pollen from another plant), and (5) natural pollination (un-manipulated and randomly selected flowers exposed to pollinators in the field).
Abiotic and self-pollination are used for local pollination for the second rule.
Although the findings indicate that stigma receptivity and release of pollen occur at the same time, there is a lesser chance for self-pollination as the stigma of S.
(2) Abiotic self-pollination process forms the basis of local pollination.
First, damaged plants might experience a reduced cost of self-pollination because they experience very low levels of self-pollen movement, or are highly pollen limited.
Relative to self-pollination, outcross pollination results in greater proportion of flowers setting fruit, and greater proportion of ovules yielding seeds per fruit.
It is clear though that the number of seeds produced by the self-pollination treatments were consistently lower than those from the cross pollination treatments and reproductive success would be better estimated by taking into account not only fruit and seed sets, but seed germination as well.