self-control

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self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl'),
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes and societal expectations.
2. A person's use of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations, in contrast to passive conditioning strategies that do things to the person and require no action by that person.

self-control

(sĕlf′kən-trōl′)
n.
Control of one's emotions, desires, or actions by one's own will.

self′-con·trolled′ adj.

self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl')
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes, and societal expectations.
2. Use by a person of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations, in contrast to passive conditioning strategies that do things to the person and require no response.

self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl')
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes, and societal expectations.
2. A person's use of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations.
References in periodicals archive ?
As it unfolds, a victim-mother overcomes her victimhood by "choosing" adoption for her child, and thus masters her peril and plights through her own actions; this self-mastery then gets rewarded with the returning adoptee's success in life, often signaled by educational and professional achievements, and English language ability.
I have already argued (in my original paper) why this will result in a requirement of compensation: the welfare boon of self-mastery simply outweighs the welfare gained for much of the contemporary poor through the market.
(b) Even if it was true that, in some extraordinary circumstances, healing by 'self-mastery' was possible, Coue's failure to immediately eliminate those with counterproductive limitations--such as, for example, those lacking the required dedication, mind-set, talent, diligence, persistence, patience, etc.--resulted in many (clearly unsuited) individuals mistakenly postponing (otherwise) life-saving operations and delaying (otherwise) radical medical treatment far beyond any prospect of recovery or cure.
Indeed freedom as self-mastery is the very foundation of the virtuous life.
Students who have debt are more likely to have more low self-mastery and students with a high self-mastery have better perceived financial well-being and psychological well-being (Norviliti, Szablicki, & Wilson, 2003).
He says, "You become more disciplined, considerate, and loving through a thousand small acts of self-control, sharing, service, friendship, and refined enjoyment." He concludes that no person can achieve self-mastery alone.
It means knowledge of one's fertility, self-mastery, consideration of duties towards God, themselves, their family, and society in a "correct hierarchy of values" (HV 10) and the "deliberate and generous decision to raise a numerous family, or by the decision, made for grave motives and with due respect for the moral law, to avoid for the time being, or even for an indeterminate period, a new birth" (HV 10).
Sweden, May 11 -- The Buddha, using himself as the supreme example, based the entirety of his teachings on self-mastery. The Four Noble Truths, specifically the prescription detailed in the Fourth Noble Truth, the Noble Eightfold Path, instructs us to carefully and continually observe the mind, which leads us to disciplining the ego or false sense of self; this in turn enables us to make conscious corrections in one's external behavior, and in the thinking and feeling that takes place in one's internal environment; all of which expands one's Right View, which ultimately leads to enlightenment.
DuCote commented on the fact that some choose leadership while for other "leadership chooses them." He noted, "Sometimes life puts us in circumstances where we have to lead, even if it is reluctantly" DuCote learned early on the importance of self-mastery as a leader.
The pursuit of truth, of course, has led some great minds to reject the very possibility and desirability of self-mastery, so much more could be said on the subject.
These competencies include virtues such as the courage to overcome fears, the self-mastery to resist temptations and the habit of stopping to reflect on competing claims about what it means to thrive and lead a fully flourishing life.
It is hypothesized that this sense of confidence and perceived self-mastery resulting from self-assessment would contribute to learners' self-efficacy.