self-control

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self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl'),
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes and societal expectations.
2. A person's use of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations, in contrast to passive conditioning strategies that do things to the person and require no action by that person.

self-control

(sĕlf′kən-trōl′)
n.
Control of one's emotions, desires, or actions by one's own will.

self′-con·trolled′ adj.

self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl')
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes, and societal expectations.
2. Use by a person of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations, in contrast to passive conditioning strategies that do things to the person and require no response.

self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl')
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes, and societal expectations.
2. A person's use of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the classical view expressed by Aristotle, it is not the protection of a merely negative freedom of each individual to live as he wishes that constitutes the end and justification of politics but freedom in the sense of rational and virtuous self-mastery.
The average self-mastery score for the full sample was 30 (SD = 4.
It means knowledge of one's fertility, self-mastery, consideration of duties towards God, themselves, their family, and society in a "correct hierarchy of values" (HV 10) and the "deliberate and generous decision to raise a numerous family, or by the decision, made for grave motives and with due respect for the moral law, to avoid for the time being, or even for an indeterminate period, a new birth" (HV 10).
Indeed, we may be able to get them to share with us their own struggle for self-mastery, and we may end up learning from them as much as they can learn from us.
Restraint and self-mastery shapes and nurtures one's character; it helps it to evolve its way of being in the world and eventually mold its outward expression into a peaceful and serene demeanor.
They teach self-mastery by cultivating students' taste for what it means to engage life fully.
With respect to self-assessment and self-efficacy, Bandura (1977) argues that the sense of perceived self-mastery resulting from self-assessment contributes to learners' self-efficacy.
1), these texts privilege amorous activity for the purpose of instructing readers in the self-mastery necessary to effective political action.
This increased confidence and feeling of self-mastery might serve as a model for her children," she added.
Weiss connects the pleasure of BDSM to the ideas of self-mastery and the goodness of work found in traditional American mores.
Plato demonstrates how much of political life can and should be liberalized in a naturally reasonable direction, places artists' talents within the self-mastery and legal guidance of political virtue, and extends the notion that minding one's own and participating in the common good can be one, intending to show the limit to political practice and to determine its nature.
A visiting Fulbright Professor at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, Chatterjee's interest areas include transformational leadership, personal growth, learning organisation, self-mastery and Asian culture and management.