self-limiting

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self-limiting

(sĕlf-lĭm′ĭ-tĭng)
adj.
1. Limiting oneself or itself.
2. Self-limited.

self′-lim′i·ta′tion (-tā′shən) n.

self-limiting

therapeutic agent/disease whose effects cease in a predictable manner
References in periodicals archive ?
I am inclined to think that a world in which the voluntary self-limitation and forbearance described by Professor Mahoney constituted the norm, and not the exception, would be the only world truly marked by human progress.
well-being as opposed to well-having), founded upon a self-limitation of needs.
Through the collective practice of Self-Limitation, we refuse the bargain monopoly capital has offered up to us of being cogs in its perpetual motion machine of expanding profit in exchange for owning ever more things.
because his possibilities are unlimited, and hence, "the ultimate problem of autonomous man: the self-limitation of the individual and of the political community.
For those who wish to retain divine omnipotence (or more of it than process theologians often do, at least), the claim of God's self-limitation becomes key.
Our present difficulty is that the darkening ecological crisis is making us aware of the need for an alternative way of living, and yet despite the horrors of the BP oilspill and Tar Sands we seem culturally unable to summon the will power for self-limitation.
IN the manner of someone unfamiliar with disappointment or self-limitation, Matthew is currently toying with a number of new avenues of potential excellence.
In order to extricate himself from this problem, Ramberti argues that Pomponazzi sets forth a theoretical innovation: God's self-limitation.
These volumes do, by design and self-limitation, concentrate on Europe and North America, with the sole exception of Fiorenza's treatment of Latin American liberation theology.
The talk, based on his book, will feature insights and techniques to break out of fear and self-limitation.
She summarizes Peacocke's theology of God, focusing especially on God's self-limitation with respect to both omnipotence and omniscience and to God's vulnerability and "creative suffering.