self-injurious behavior


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

self-injurious behavior

Abbreviation: SIB
Maladaptive behavior of various types, including self-scratching, illicit drug use, head banging, and tobacco use. The cause is unknown, but one theory is that the behavior is self-stimulatory.
See also: behavior
References in periodicals archive ?
Another study concluded the severity of symptoms of ASD is a risk factor of SIB.6,19,20 It is evident that the participants with more cognitive and developmental deficits may exhibit increased severity of symptoms.18 It has also been explored that children who receive intervention are less likely to get involve in self-injurious behavior than others.
Early interventions focused on strategies that improve emotional regulation can be very helpful to prevent self-injurious behaviors. Finally, future studies should explore the factors involved in the onset of this problem.
Self-injurious behavior: Differential diagnosis and functional differentiation.
In a study by Dominick, Davis, Lainhart, Tager-Fusberg, and Folstein in 2007 it was seen that aggression and self-injurious behavior were significantly more common in children with autism than children with a history of language impairment.
Similar to litigation filed in many other states, the lawsuit alleged that a large percentage of mentally ill inmates were kept in virtual solitary confinement 23 hours per day, leading to suicides and self-injurious behavior. In 2012, MDOC and the Disability Law Center reached a settlement agreement in which MDOC, building upon initiatives begun prior to any lawsuit, agreed to maintain two secure treatment units (STUs) at high-security level prisons as alternatives to disciplinary segregation for inmates with SMI.
In a case of a student with severe autism, not only did his self-injurious behavior decrease when provided a schedule of activities, but his level of engagement increased (O'Reilly, Sigafoos, Lancioni, Edrisinha, & Andrews, 2005).
A number of research studies have found that adolescents and adults who engage in self-injurious behaviors (SIBs) are at a much higher risk for suicide than are members of the general population (Cooper et al., 2005; Nock, Joiner, Gordon, Lloyd-Richardson, & Prinstein, 2006; Whitlock & Knox, 2007).
Historically, nonsuicidal self-injury research has focused on adult populations, on populations that experience developmental disabilities or psychoses, or on clinical samples (Brodsky, Cloitre, & Dulit, 1995).Although rates of self-injurious behavior have been increasing over the past few decades among the adolescent population (Brener, Krug, & Simon, 2000; Briere & Gil, 1998), it is only more recently that attention has turned to examining NSSI among this population (Prinstein, 2008).
Self-injurious behavior. The ADSHI is a self-report instrument that we adapted from Gratz's (2001) Deliberate Self-Harm Inventory to measure current and past self-injurious behavior.
Functional assessment procedures have been used to guide the treatment process for a wide range of behavioral difficulties, including, aggression, self-injurious behavior, disruption, property destruction, ritualistic behavior, feeding disorders, pica to name a few.
A two (severity of visual impairment) by two (level of intelligence) multivariate analysis of covariance of the set of stereotyped movement scores (body movements, manipulation of objects, and self-injurious behavior) revealed a significant effect for the covariate [F(3, 43) = 3.24, p < .05, epsilon squared = .18] and significant main effects for the extent of visual impairment [F(3, 43) = 7.18, p = .001, epsilon squared = .33] and intellectual level [F(3, 43) = 4.22, p < .05, epsilon squared = .22], but not for the interaction.