self-injurious behavior


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self-injurious behavior

Abbreviation: SIB
Maladaptive behavior of various types, including self-scratching, illicit drug use, head banging, and tobacco use. The cause is unknown, but one theory is that the behavior is self-stimulatory.
See also: behavior
References in periodicals archive ?
18 It has also been explored that children who receive intervention are less likely to get involve in self-injurious behavior than others.
Comparison of non-suicidal self-injurious behavior and suicide attempts in patients admitted to a psychiatric crisis unit.
Replacing behaviors (n = 13, f = 11) is defined as "participants state that they work with the client to replace self-injurious behaviors with either alternatives to self-injury or other coping skills.
Risperidone for aggression and self-injurious behavior in adults with mental retardation.
Superficial/moderate NSSI refers to self-injurious behaviors that damage tissue only to a superficial or moderate level and are not associated with neurological illness or developmental disability (Favazza, 1998).
announced today that the first patients have been enrolled in its Phase 3 study of ecopipam for the treatment of self-injurious behaviors in patients with Lesch-Nyhan Disease.
Many co-morbid problems are associated with autism like sleep disturbances, gastrointestinal problems, depression, aggression, self-injurious behavior, anxiety, learning disabilities and obsessive- compulsive disorder (Ming, Brimacombe, Chaaban, Zimmerman-Bier, and Wagner, 2008).
These inappropriate responses, such as extreme self-injurious behavior, violent disturbances and serious assaults on staff often perpetuate inmates' placement in the very settings that exacerbate their mental health issues.
Furthermore, traditional treatment protocols for eating disorders were not designed to simultaneously treat chronic suicidal and self-injurious behavior, ongoing therapy-interfering behaviors (e.
Sharon Freagon (1990) "To argue the merits of using severe punishment or aversives with any person with developmental disabilities, who exhibits self-injurious behavior or behavior that is a danger to others, is immoral and unethical" (p.
Although rates of self-injurious behavior have been increasing over the past few decades among the adolescent population (Brener, Krug, & Simon, 2000; Briere & Gil, 1998), it is only more recently that attention has turned to examining NSSI among this population (Prinstein, 2008).