self-incompatibility


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self-incompatibility

a condition in plants where certain types of pollen will not form pollen tubes when deposited on the female stigma, thus preventing fertilization. Self-incompatibility prevents self-fertilization and promotes heterozygosity (the mixing of allelic forms). The system is controlled by an S locus with many alleles (see MULTIPLE ALLELISM), and pollen with the same allele as in the stigma will not germinate to form a pollen tube. This is shown in Fig. 279. Self-incompatibility mechanisms are much used to produce HYBRID plants (e.g. various Brassica crops). See also COMPATIBILITY.
References in periodicals archive ?
In hermaphrodites, self-incompatibility produces differences in fertilization success that are similar in magnitude to among-species crosses, which could result in fairly strong selection pressures against self-fertilization when non-self eggs are available.
Pollen tube growth was not interrupted in the cross-pollination treatment, in contrast to self-pollinated flowers, where pollen tube growth stopped in the stigma or in the style, identifying possible sites of pre-zygotic self-incompatibility.
Macrophylogenetic analyses of the gain and loss of self-incompatibility in the Asteraceae.
dominant self-incompatibility inhibitor (De Jong et al., 1971).
Identification of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers for self-incompatibility alleles in hazelnut.
In flowering plants (also called angiosperms), an intraspecific reproductive mechanism, self-incompatibility (SI), has so far been widely known.
specific goals were to determine: presence of spontaneous self-fertilization (i.e., breakdown of self-incompatibility) in three species, D.