self-help

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self-help

(sĕlf′hĕlp″)
Action taken by a person to improve his or her life educationally, emotionally, financially, interpersonally, or socially.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Master Keys to Success, this is the very essence of self-help and self-improvement. Obstacles and challenges will always test the mettle of man.
They're reading self-improvement books, biographies, books about successful people, things like that."
The ideology of doryoku and kinben was thus widely disseminated in Japanese society and perhaps today works as the unquestioned motivation to actively participate in self-improvement lessons.
He said: "There needs to be a return to Victorian values that are very much centred around self-improvement and the creation of things that are going to last.
Let's hope the new location of Middlesbrough College in Middlehaven will not deter people from seeking further education and self-improvement.
The Nu-age Medical Spa focuses on the five elements of self-improvement which are cosmetic surgery, non-surgical treatments, cosmetic dentistry, anti-ageing programmes and cosmeceuticals.
These lines of reasoning and empirical research findings suggest that a learning goal orientation encourages employees to seek information that can be used for self-improvement.
Towards personal excellence; psychometric tests and self-improvement techniques for managers, 2d ed.
Some so-called "self-improvement guru" reckons certain number and flower combinations can bring good luck.
Quoting liberally from the diaries and journals Robbins kept all of his life--full of his plans for self-improvement, his dreams (jotted down upon waking), and his fears--Vaill locates a sort of Rosebud motif in a song from West Side Story, "Somewhere," which yearns for a place of peace and love.
It is the coach's love for the sport that leads them to seek self-improvement. Such "passion" makes him a better teacher.
One of the most popular self-improvement books of the 1990s, Steven Coveys Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, listed as its first principle, "Begin with the End in Mind."