self-image

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Related to self-images: Negative self image

self-image

(sĕlf′ĭm′ĭj)
n.
The conception that one has of oneself, including an assessment of qualities and personal worth.

self-image

A person's conception of his or her own appearance, personality and capabilities.
References in periodicals archive ?
This method may also be useful in some urgent situations by allowing patients to take self-images of the eye and share them with a physician.
In addition, previous researchers have found that congruence between brand image and self-image is an important variable influencing the effects of advertising (Cowart, Fox, & Wilson, 2008; Jamal & Al-Marri, 2007).
Self-image is the attitude of the individual towards oneself.
Her work offers hope that, through understanding the distorted self-images our mothers inherited from their mothers, we can reclaim our ability to see and lovingly accept ourselves without blaming those who raised us.
A right brain network of these mirror neurons maintains an internal self-image for comparison with faces that one sees, Uddin and her colleagues propose.
It produced five dimensions, which could be characterized and ordered in terms of the amount of variance explained of the children's self-images; Factor 1: self-confidence (21.7%), Factor 2: relation to teacher and school (10.3%), Factor 3: physical appearance (6.5%), Factor 4: sport achievements (5.4%), and Factor 5: relations to classmates (5.0%).
The things survivors of childhood cancer worry about may shape their self-images and life outlooks, and subsequently may affect their ability to successfully accomplish developmental tasks such as dating, leaving school, entering the job market, leaving home, marrying and beginning a family, and ultimately achieving economically and socially productive lives.
Doherty considers poems by Akhmatova, Gumilev, and Mandel'shtam, and explores the problem of the poet's self-image, identifying strategies with which the Acmeists playfully encouraged biographical readings of the fabricated self-image, and arguing that Acmeists created self-representations that were less egocentric than Symbolist self-images, or consciously inauthentic versions of the self.
Accordingly, people feel threatened by any direct attempt by others to challenge or change their self-images. These perceived threats cause subjects in crisis to defend even more strongly their image of themselves and deny any challenges to it.
According to Miles, the Bible's plot begins with God's desire for a self-image. It thickens when God's self-image becomes a maker of self-images and God resents it.
By recognizing the above mechanisms for defense of our self-image, we can realize that they are often used to defend unrealistic or untrue self-images.
The new mythology redefined self-images and images of the Other, the main figures, and narratives about them, creating a new version of ancestral history.