self-hatred


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self-hatred

(sĕlf′hā′trĭd) or

self-hate

(-hāt′)
n.
Hatred, disregard, and denigration of oneself.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"We can't give up, and we must remain in the front lines as we fight this battle for equality." Readers of "I Am Woman" will understand why many trans women, including Husu, struggle with abusive relationships, self-hatred, and substance abuse, but they will also grasp how this marginalized community is weaving its way into the fabric of mainstream American society on a quest to live richer and more fulfilling lives.
However, the fear and self-hatred will be suppressed and will be projected as fear of and hatred for socially legitimised victim groups, which will usually be people of other racial or religious groups.
"This man stole my soul and set me on a path of self-hatred and self destruction that persisted for years.
David Mamet is a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, screenwriter and director mid author of The Wicked Son: Anti-Semitism, Self-hatred, and the Jews.
I really, truly think this is the great soul wound of Western culture: self-hatred and negative self-talk.
In many situations self-hatred has been invoked where Jews have criticized what is typically "Jewish," and more recently, when Jews from abroad have criticized Israeli politics, especially with respect to the Palestinian problem, allegations of Jewish antisemitism or self-hatred have been the response.
Paul Reitter's On the Origins of Jewish Self-Hatred (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2012).
He spirals downwards into self-hatred as a result.'
with so much shame and self-hatred you will wriggle out of yourself
An overall profile interpretation of each identity type resulted in the finding that several of the attitudes associated with Cross's Nigrescence Theory, specifically assimilation, racial self-hatred, anti-White, Afrocentric, and multiculturalist inclusive, were reflected in the qualitative themes.
Dear Editor, While reading Alan Clawley's obituary of John Madin and of the on-going demolition of Madin's work, I was struck by how Birmingham seems stuck in a never ending cycle of self-hatred and destruction.
A sampling of topics include: Jewish self-identification and West-European categories of belonging, the legitimization of the Diaspora experience, Jewish self-hatred in Germany and England, German Jews in Victorian England, and Jewish converts in 19th century Warsaw.