self-fertilization


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Related to self-fertilization: cross-fertilization

self-fer·til·i·za·tion

(self'fer'til-i-zā'shŭn),
Fecundation of the ovules by the pollen of the same flower, or of the ova by the spermatozoa of the same animal in hermaphroditic forms; denoting an extreme type of inbreeding seen in certain plants and animal forms that produce both male and female gametes.

self-fertilization

(sĕlf′fûr′tl-ĭ-zā′shən)
n.
Fertilization by male gametes from the same individual, as by sperm from the same animal in hermaphroditic species or by pollen from the same plant.

self′-fer′til·ized′ (-īzd′) adj.
self′-fer′til·iz′ing adj.

self-fertilization

the fusion of male and female GAMETES from the same HERMAPHRODITE individual. Self-fertilization is fairly rare in animals (occurring, for example, in some snails and nematode worms) but is common in some plant groups. see SELF-POLLINATION. Compare CROSS-FERTILIZATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Self-fertilization as an alternative mode of reproduction in the solitary tunicate Pyura chilensis.
The effect of synergism on the evolution of self-fertilization is to increase the equilibrium inbreeding depression over what would be expected if mutations act independently (B.
Partial self-fertilization is a common event in the laboratory spawning of hermaphroditic pectinids (Beaumont & Budd 1983, Ibarra et al.
e(v)] for mixed self and random mating; and (iii) adapt these formulas to specific aspects of germplasm collection and regeneration and discuss the effects of different levels of self-fertilization and different mating systems on the estimated values of [N.
Self-fertilization is rare among opisthobranchs, yet common in their sister taxon, the pulmonates (Jarne and Charleswoth, 1993).
Similar results have previously been obtained by comparing pair-crosses between the two stocks with their self-fertilization in this species (Zheng et al.
Similarly, species with a greater degree of self-fertilization by hermaphrodites might display less nuclear gene flow than was seen in S.
These animals were used to analyze self-fertilization in C.
Sakai cautions that she was not able to perform all the standard experiments that nail down pollination details, such as excluding insects from blossoms to check for self-fertilization.
Seed harvested from the two parents of each cross was kept separate to examine whether any self-fertilization had occurred (Table 2).
Multiple paternity and self-fertilization in relation to floral age in Mimulus guttatus (Scrophulariaceae).