self-esteem

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self-esteem

 [self es-tēm´]
respect for or pride about oneself; see also self-esteem enhancement.
chronic low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a longstanding negative self-evaluation or feeling about one's own self or self-capabilities.
risk for situational low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for developing a negative perception of self-worth (situational low self-esteem).
situational low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a negative perception of self-worth in response to a current situation (specify).

self-esteem

(sĕlf′ĭ-stēm′)
n.
Pride in oneself; self-respect.

self-esteem1

the degree of worth and competence one attributes to oneself. See also self-concept.

self-esteem2

a nursing outcome from the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) defined as personal judgment of self-worth. See also Nursing Outcomes Classification.

self-esteem

Self-worth Psychology The internalized sense of one's own worth

self-esteem

the totality of a person's evaluation of their worth as an individual. Also known as self-evaluation and self-worth.

self-esteem,

n the degree of worth and competence one attributes to oneself.
References in periodicals archive ?
When analyzed, according to gender, the t-test results for independent groups of discrepancy of points belonging to athlete students' self-esteem level; between male (X = 0.
In Table 3, one-way ANOVA statistic results are seen to determine discrepancy, according to age, of points belonging to athlete students' self-esteem level.
When analyzed, according to team or individual sport branches, the t-test results for independent groups of discrepancy of points belonging to athlete students' self-esteem level; between students who play team sports (X=0.
When analyzed, according to national athlete status, the t-test results for independent groups of discrepancy of points belonging to athlete students' self-esteem level; between national athletes (X=0.
According to Table 6, directly away, low and statistically insignificant relationship was figured out between athlete students' point averages and self-esteem (r= -0.
In this study, athlete students' self-esteem level points' relationship with different variables (age, gender, national athlete status, situation of playing team or individual sports, academic average) was analyzed.
Research in this regard has pointed to the idea that religious beliefs do impact self-concept and self-esteem.
This in turn allows for an added context in which self-esteem can be looked at, As spiritual identity entails the belief that the individual is an "eternal being and connected to God" (Poll & Smith, 2003, p.
Studies have shown relations between self-esteem and parental attachments (Laible, Carlo, & Roesch, 2004; Wilkinson, 2004), such that having close supportive relationships with parents is positively associated to self-esteem.
Taking all these into consideration, it would seem highly plausible that religious beliefs--mainly, beliefs about God, especially in His love, availability, and ability to help--may influence self-esteem, particularly when self-esteem is seen in terms of self-worth and self-competence (Tafarodi & Milne, 2002).
In addition to constructing a psychometrically sound measure, the present study also examined the notion that God-centered self-esteem and self-esteem are similar, yet sufficiently distinct from each other for practical utility.
Exploration of the distinctiveness of God-centered self-esteem and self-esteem was done using three approaches.