self-esteem


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self-esteem

 [self es-tēm´]
respect for or pride about oneself; see also self-esteem enhancement.
chronic low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a longstanding negative self-evaluation or feeling about one's own self or self-capabilities.
risk for situational low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for developing a negative perception of self-worth (situational low self-esteem).
situational low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a negative perception of self-worth in response to a current situation (specify).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

self-esteem

(sĕlf′ĭ-stēm′)
n.
Pride in oneself; self-respect.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

self-esteem

Self-worth Psychology The internalized sense of one's own worth
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
For over half a century, self-esteem has been viewed as the psychologist's "...
Although the significant negative correlation between the contingency (Paradise & Kernis, 1999) and level of self-esteem (Rosenberg, 1965) has been mentioned in previous studies (Chen, Ye, & Zhou, 2013; Kernis et al., 2008; Tomaka, Morales-Monks, & Shamaley, 2013), few researchers have focused on the relationship between these two types of self-esteem.
'The real meaning of Iqbal's concept of self-esteem was self-reliance and without self-reliance we could not be able to maintain self-esteem', he said.
Low self-esteem is a negative evaluation of oneself.
Keywords: Self-esteem, Eunuchs, Hazara division, Pakistan, Snowball.
Furthermore, t-test revealed significant gender differences in self-esteem and neuroticism.
(d) The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale: The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) by Rosenberg, M.
A self-developed demographic form, Multi-Dimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Urdu Version (Rizwan and Aftab, 2009) and Urdu Version of Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale by (Sardar, 1998) were used as measures.
Self-esteem was assessed using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES).
Self-esteem has been defined as "the individual's positive or negative attitude toward the self as a totality" (Rosenberg, Schooler, Schoenbach, & Rosenberg, 1995, p.
"Just feeling connected to others helps sustain self-esteem," says study coauthor Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, OSU professor of communication.