self-esteem


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self-esteem

 [self es-tēm´]
respect for or pride about oneself; see also self-esteem enhancement.
chronic low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a longstanding negative self-evaluation or feeling about one's own self or self-capabilities.
risk for situational low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for developing a negative perception of self-worth (situational low self-esteem).
situational low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a negative perception of self-worth in response to a current situation (specify).

self-esteem

(sĕlf′ĭ-stēm′)
n.
Pride in oneself; self-respect.

self-esteem1

the degree of worth and competence one attributes to oneself. See also self-concept.

self-esteem2

a nursing outcome from the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) defined as personal judgment of self-worth. See also Nursing Outcomes Classification.

self-esteem

Self-worth Psychology The internalized sense of one's own worth

self-esteem

the totality of a person's evaluation of their worth as an individual. Also known as self-evaluation and self-worth.

self-esteem,

n the degree of worth and competence one attributes to oneself.
References in periodicals archive ?
Self-confidence, self-esteem, and assumption of sex role in young men and women.
Washington, March 13 ( ANI ): Researchers have shown that boosting self-esteem can help buffer potential health threats typically associated with the transition into older adulthood.
Self-esteem can be a hard concept to grasp -- especially if you've been suffering from a lifelong lack of it.
The fourth annual Dove Self-Esteem Weekend, which was held Oct.
Women's successes at work deal a blow to their partner's self-esteem, making men more pessimistic about the longer-term prospects of their relationship, research has revealed.
In psychology, self-esteem generally refers to a personal assessment by a person of his or her own worth (Hewitt, 2009).
Each subsequent contribution addresses a particular aspect of the topic including social and emotional contexts, implications for self-regulation and relationships, development of self-esteem, explicit and implicit self-esteem and psychological adjustment, self-esteem as an interpersonal signal, and competence and worthiness training as therapy.
When put behind bars as a juvenile and forgotten by those who see them only as delinquents, it is no surprise that his or her self-esteem is damaged.
Since people are not isolated from their environment, a person's experiences impact his or her self-esteem.
The present study was conducted to develop and validate a God-centered self-esteem scale that assesses an individual's evaluations of the self in the context of God's love, availability, and ability to help.
Although observational studies cannot prove the existence of a causal relationship, researchers have reported an association between relatively poor self-esteem and substance use initiation.
Alan Anderson at the University of Minnesota, discuss the role of birth order in the development of self-esteem.