self-effacement

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self-effacement

 [self-ĕ-fās´ment]
in bioethics, a virtue consisting of obligations of fidelity, or putting patients and their needs before the self-interest of the professional. Professionals give precedence or priority to the needs of patients rather than fulfilling their own needs; patients' interests take priority over the interests of others. Changes in the structure of health care have caused many stresses and divided loyalties for all health care professionals. Conflicts can be between the interests of patients and those of institutions, funding agencies, corporations, the state, and so forth.
References in periodicals archive ?
"It was self-effacing humour - and it was important because if we'd got down and down-trodden, it could all have turned out a lot worse."
Recalling the mood over lunch, Swann said: "We all sat there laughing at each other - saying 'How bad are we?' "It was self-effacing humour - and it was important, because if we'd got down and down-trodden it could all have turned out a lot worse."
Your seemingly self-effacing attitude towards women "out of your league" may be helping you with the "stunners".
But the second act belonged to Zdenek Konvalina's Albrecht, with his self-effacing devotion and his 24 magnificent entrechat sixes, buoyant with determination.
Not that he is a self-effacing "sensitive" (as Ivan Karp once termed artists too modest with respect to their muse to make a bold move).
And, as his recent appearance on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart demonstrated, he's also remarkably handsome, with a charming, self-effacing demeanor to match.
The self-effacing Heiberger makes it a point to stress, "I didn't do this all by myself," and reels off a batch of names--Gary Malin, Greg Young, Belinda Pastana, Nancy Sager, Jimmy Economou, Gordon Golub, Larry Goldblatt, Jessica Duffy, Joe Lops ...
But it was not so long ago that communicators mainly wore shades of corporate blue and gray, in their roles as the self-effacing press contact or the industrial editor.
While he was a modest and self-effacing, indeed, a taciturn, Scotsman he was also a hero and this biography does full justice both to his work whilst at the same time describing the world within which he did it.
Alexander Shaumyan's trademark is wry or self-effacing humor, heart rending psalms of loneliness and love, and cynical commentaries on modern times.
Lewis's skill, as Evans rightly notes, lay in "his sensuous and civilized descriptions, his poker-faced wit" and in his fluid, self-effacing style.