self-effacement


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self-effacement

 [self-ĕ-fās´ment]
in bioethics, a virtue consisting of obligations of fidelity, or putting patients and their needs before the self-interest of the professional. Professionals give precedence or priority to the needs of patients rather than fulfilling their own needs; patients' interests take priority over the interests of others. Changes in the structure of health care have caused many stresses and divided loyalties for all health care professionals. Conflicts can be between the interests of patients and those of institutions, funding agencies, corporations, the state, and so forth.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's this self-effacement, tempered with a quiet confidence, that endeared Berkshire-born Young to a TV audience of millions on Pop Idol.
There was no triumphalism from the Rangers manager as he accepted the plaudits at Hampden with humility and self-effacement. His largely unreported comment that Rangers would not have won the Treble had the club enjoyed a successful European run was not just a reminder to his directors of the fragility of his squad but a genuine acknowledgement of Celtic's heroics in the UEFA Cup.
It seems that no amount of self-effacement on their part can keep them in spiritual obscurity.
He sees similar personality traits in Paracelsians, such as rebelliousness and narcissism, as opposed to mechanists, such as caution and self-effacement. The approach suffers from the same problems as all such attempts to categorize a group.
If the former, the self-effacement makes the reader want to know more about what was going on in her mind, more about her reaction to the communities that embraced her.
Ferrara, "Representation or Self-Effacement? The Axiom In Persona Christi in St.
The chapters which focus on Burney, Austen, Bronte, and Gaskell show how women authors exploit the constraints and the liberties of modesty--how Austen knowingly conspires in Fanny Price's modest resistance to desire to reward her finally with all that she desires; and how in Lucy Snowe Bronte transforms modesty into a knowing self-effacement which locates female desire '[a]t once everywhere and nowhere'.
"But to suppose that earthly diversity is past its prime, and that a strenuous program of self-effacement is the best contribution our species has left to offer, is neither good biology nor good history."
I admire this strong, well-edited film both for Henson's self-effacement in the interviews and for its not insisting on what Corbin is telling us.
So she did what a professional social worker usually doesn't have time to do - "I did nothing," she says with offhanded self-effacement. "I sat and watched soap operas with them, like a friend.
But, savoring degrees of subtlety, slightness, intimacy, and handmade imperfection, perhaps we could interpret the pale spectrum of off-white to convey shades of self-effacement oscillating between transparent and opaque.