self-destructive

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self-destructive

(sĕlf′dĭ-strŭk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Tending to do harm to oneself.
2. Marked by an impulse or tendency to harm or kill oneself.

self′-de·struc′tive·ly adv.
self′-de·struc′tive·ness n.
References in periodicals archive ?
"I'm not sure I want you to quote that--I don't mean the self-destructiveness. What I mean is, I live for my art to the point that my health comes second.
They have also managed to give both culturally and academically different considerations of this phenomenon, as well as to examine the benefits or self-destructiveness to its "believers".
It also leads authorities to lose touch with social realities, to supplant and suppress informal and traditional institutions such as the family, and to tend toward tyranny and self-destructiveness. The author proposes that liberalism be countered by more emphasis on tradition, religion, particularity, and transcendence.
For instance, Val Holley's otherwise superior 1995 chronicle of James Dean finds the need to close with the most simple sentimentality: "Dean's earthy records were achieved because of--not in spite of--his self-destructiveness, insecurity, and vulnerability.
Her journal entries disclose a shocking strain of self-destructiveness that epitomizes the devil-may-care Zeitgeist.
Seeking them too eagerly is akin to the self-destructiveness of looking for the "perpetual high."
Hamilton discusses Wolfe's "impulsivity and self-destructiveness" and contends that they "contributed to his death at 37 in that he exposed himself recklessly to a perceptibly dangerous situation ..." (280).
In addition to demographic information, participants were assessed with respect to chronic self-destructiveness, locus of control, and hypergender ideology.
Obsessional self-destructiveness played a much bigger role in his life than careerism ever did: witness his endless youthful fights with successive theater managements; the Dresden revolutionary activism of 1849, which sent him into exile for twelve years; and, even after King Ludwig had become his champion, his fury over Ludwig's insistence on staging Das Rheingold and Die Walkure without the composer's approval.
And Christopher has some shrewd things to say about self-destructiveness. But it appears as if the playwright, like her narcissistic characters, feels that when it comes to the mundane chores of basic dramaturgy, she's entitled to a free pass.
The problem with the Soviet regime is not so much in its totalitarian brutality but its absurdist--underlined by the title of his major book, The Yawning Heights-- self-destructiveness. The same, as Zinov'ev implied in his later works, could be said about the post-Soviet society, which, as all previous regimes had emerged and proliferated because people supported them on their own.
He said the film is intended to "present a society filled with deprecations and self-destructiveness" without taking notice of the scientific advances of the ancient Mayas.