self-destructive

(redirected from self-destructiveness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

self-destructive

(sĕlf′dĭ-strŭk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Tending to do harm to oneself.
2. Marked by an impulse or tendency to harm or kill oneself.

self′-de·struc′tive·ly adv.
self′-de·struc′tive·ness n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chronic self-destructiveness may also be related to smoking status.
And Christopher has some shrewd things to say about self-destructiveness.
Thus, we follow the travails of Declan (Ethan Embry), a cop who rarely veers from self-pity, self-destructiveness or outright craziness; Colin (Brian F.
The problem with the Soviet regime is not so much in its totalitarian brutality but its absurdist--underlined by the title of his major book, The Yawning Heights-- self-destructiveness.
This Romeo & Juliet reflected an understanding of the play as one more concerned with the cyclical violence and self-destructiveness of its broader social world than with the relationship between its titular lovers.
Questionnaires and exercises help readers work through their issues so that they can overcome their tendencies toward self-blame, self-hatred, and self-destructiveness.
Seen as exemplars of unrestrained hedonism and irrationality accelerated by affluence, Coney crowds were viewed also as manifestations of "boredom" and self-destructiveness that seemed to be released when workers had time free from work and other regular obligations.
Yet it is important to stress that this brevity had nothing to do with the self-destructiveness so often associated with artists who die young.
Personal misfortune and self-destructiveness will be the least of their problems--they will soon become afflicted with the malady of loving one another.
However, in its self-destructiveness it becomes 'a kind of rebellion, not against authority, but within [the Spartan code of self-restraint]' (61).
For example, realizing the self-destructiveness of anger, he began to learn to control his emotions, as illustrated in his statement, "I don't feel like doing the work.
Damaged goods: Low self-esteem, depression, self-destructiveness (suicide and self-mutilation), guilt, shame, self-blame, constant search for approval, and nurturance.