self-definition

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self-definition

(sĕlf′dĕf′ə-nĭsh′ən)
n.
The definition of one's identity, character, abilities, and attitudes by oneself: work provided the primary basis for her self-definition.
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As noted previously, one component of self-determination is identity formation or self-definition. Contextual factors in the lives of young people have been shown to influence the development of one's self-definition (Greenberger, Chuansheng, & Beam, 1998; Heilman, 1998).
Schools, however, can also have an atmosphere of risk (Astor et al., 1999), which in turn influences students' sense of self-definition and increases the likelihood that they will struggle with critical issues.
Through the development of self-definition, adolescents grapple with issues of sexuality, relationships, drug use, career decisions, academic demands, and major events in the lives of their families.
The other striking aspect of contemporary rights language is the implicit, sometimes explicit, sense of a right to self-definition. Again, self-definition has its roots in an old liberal notion of our right to express our free individuality.
There are many people in academia, and many gay theorists, who do indeed argue that the new reproductive technologies will and should offer something like a lifestyle choice or means to self-definition, beyond all conventional limits to our human bodies.
The narrator subverts this stage of the discourse with signs that invite us to analyze and participate in the process of self-definition that he undertakes.
He looks at the dawning of a new day which will be part of the ongoing experience of self-definition in which he involves himself.
In order to begin to examine the process of self-definition, it is first necessary to develop a measure of self-perception.
The 24-item scale that results from the present study is an initial attempt to identify the process of self-definition. The three factors which we have identified seem to reflect, at least somewhat, the two processes of self-definition that have emerged from theories earlier presented by Bem (1972) on the one hand and by DeCharms (1983) and Ryan & Connell (1989) on the other.