self-definition


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Related to self-definition: self-contained, selves

self-definition

(sĕlf′dĕf′ə-nĭsh′ən)
n.
The definition of one's identity, character, abilities, and attitudes by oneself: work provided the primary basis for her self-definition.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"If we haven't developed other self-definitions, if our roles in our family and our community are not robust, we lose a big chunk of ourselves in that transition to retirement," says Scott Bea, PsyD, a Cleveland Clinic psychologist.
Self-definition has been defined as the ability to establish and maintain "a coherent, realistic, differentiated, and essentially positive sense of self, or an identity" (Luyten & Blatt, 2013, 172).
In this case, I think the political correctors' trick of slipping under the radar of history by avoiding self-definition is something conservatives would do well to consider adopting.
According to Rifkin, both the occlusion and hypervisibility of Native gender and sexual practices work together under Anglo-American imperial configurations to deny indigenous self-determination and self-definition. As an alternative to the objectification of Native sexuality, Rifkin highlights Native authors who reject both the heterosexual historical narrative and the imperial queer approach.
Though the effect was found only among participants who considered technological innovativeness to be an important part of their self-definition, the researchers explain that other counter-stereotypical consumers may have influence in the marketplace.
These techniques revealed that performance was a function of motivation, self-definition, and willingness to participate, rather than the subject matter per se.
His struggle so far has been one of self-positioning and self-definition. Who is he?
Since gender complementarity excluded women from the public sphere, Schlegel's novel constructs alternative possibilities for female self-definition in the private sphere, in the process radically expanding the boundaries of the feminine private sphere.
He creates a stream of constant self-definition and re-definition that rides up along the emotional highs of love, success, and pride and down through the lows of rejection, loss, and shame, while also opening the story to a host of literal spirits.
She shows that although the idea of chosenness has been central to Judaism and Jewish self-definition, it has not been carried to the present day in the same form.
Rather than creating a biography of Wells as an activist and agitator or a history of lynching the Jim Crow era, Davidson recounts the first thirty years of Wells's life in "an attempt to chart one women's step toward personal and cultural self-definition" (10).