self-conscious

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self-conscious

(sĕlf′kŏn′shəs)
adj.
1. Aware of oneself as an individual or of one's own being, actions, or thoughts.
2. Socially ill at ease: The self-conscious teenager sat alone during lunch.
3. Excessively conscious of one's appearance or manner: The self-conscious actor kept fixing his hair.
4. Showing the effects of self-consciousness; stilted: self-conscious prose.

self′-con′scious·ly adv.
self′-con′scious·ness n.

self-conscious

1 the state of being aware of oneself as an individual entity that experiences, desires, and acts.
2 a heightened awareness of oneself and one's actions as reflected by the observations and reactions of others; socially ill at ease. self-consciousness, n.

self-conscious

Being aware of oneself, esp. overly aware of appearance and actions, and thus being ill at ease.
References in periodicals archive ?
B) Some philosophers explicitly eschew first-person approaches to consciousness and to self-consciousness.
The concepts to which I especially want to draw attention are those which together form Hegel's oppositional model of the individual mind achieving self-consciousness within history.
The future generations, the human species and nature itself become transcendent as the significant Another in front of our self-consciousness.
With regard to this, I will object that McDowell commits Hegel to the wrong picture of Kant's theory of apperception, and that both McDowell and Pippin fail to acknowledge the relevance of motivation and affectivity for self-consciousness.
Hypothesis 2: Public self-consciousness will have a positive influence on green product purchasing.
As can be seen in table 2, the relationship between emotional aspects of suffering and spirituality aspects shows that there is a negative significant relationship between physical suffering and self-consciousness ness at 95% certainty (p < 0.
The human version of self-consciousness, in contrast, involves a good deal of thinking about what it means to be what we are and how we fit with everything else.
Metaphysics of any stripe involves a significant element of self-consciousness.
In human beings self-consciousness presupposes sense-consciousness but is not identical with it.
All this background is important for understanding what is at stake in Hegel on Self-Consciousness, the work under review here.

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