self-conscious

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self-conscious

(sĕlf′kŏn′shəs)
adj.
1. Aware of oneself as an individual or of one's own being, actions, or thoughts.
2. Socially ill at ease: The self-conscious teenager sat alone during lunch.
3. Excessively conscious of one's appearance or manner: The self-conscious actor kept fixing his hair.
4. Showing the effects of self-consciousness; stilted: self-conscious prose.

self′-con′scious·ly adv.
self′-con′scious·ness n.

self-conscious

1 the state of being aware of oneself as an individual entity that experiences, desires, and acts.
2 a heightened awareness of oneself and one's actions as reflected by the observations and reactions of others; socially ill at ease. self-consciousness, n.

self-conscious

Being aware of oneself, esp. overly aware of appearance and actions, and thus being ill at ease.
References in periodicals archive ?
If Althoff's installation had actually been the labor of some of the obsessive netting-and-veil queens from whom he self-consciously borrows--people like Jack Smith, Bruce Conner, and Stevie Nicks--the gallery doors would have remained locked, with the artist still futzing with things until maybe a day before the closing.
They've very self-consciously taken the strict message discipline and the use of imagery from Ronald Reagan and the 24-hour rapid response spin and the use of half-truths from Clinton and amalgamated it into a very effective machine.
I think people who don't know her story assume that she was a self-consciously 'independent' woman of her era," notes Turner, "when in reality, she was fierce without knowing she was fierce.
This self-consciously literary film keeps overstating its themes in 'look at me, mum' ways which reveal its pretentious leanings.
Renaissance poetry is self-consciously rhetorical, and the monarchs, even though they exercised positions of power and control, had to be persuasive in enhancing their positions as heads of state.
While Stein rather self-consciously, and not entirely convincingly, claims that gay and lesbian history is a vital part of urban history, he reveals the lesbian tendency towards public invisibility that led such women to come together more in the 'private' sphere than more visible gay men did.
There was nothing self-consciously exotic or strained as they joined in their primitive ceremony.
The developments along rue de Pommard, where Jean-Pierre Buffi and others created a sequence of small courts and little streets leading down to the new urban park along the river, are some of the most sophisticated pieces of European urban housing built in the last decade (AR June 1995): they self-consciously draw on the traditions of Paris, while using up-to-date constructional techniques, and the spatial and formal potential these offer.
But I've finally been moved to try it: timidly, self-consciously, looking to see whether anybody notices.
But Peterson observes that, since her two narratives were written by white women, and since newspaper accounts of her speeches seem to have exaggerated the vernacular element in her self-presentation, "Truth" may actually be the most self-consciously manipulated image of African authenticity in the group.
Also on view were a group of droll black-and-white illustrations McKenzie contributed to a self-consciously twee Edinburgh broadsheet called The One O'Clock Gun, matted and framed with pages from the paper; a number of languid, seminude pencil studies of the artist's female friends; and big chalk-and-charcoal abstractions that transform rubbings taken from urban pavements into grisaille de Stijl grids.
Self-consciously relevant theater has rarely looked so good.