self-conscious


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self-conscious

(sĕlf′kŏn′shəs)
adj.
1. Aware of oneself as an individual or of one's own being, actions, or thoughts.
2. Socially ill at ease: The self-conscious teenager sat alone during lunch.
3. Excessively conscious of one's appearance or manner: The self-conscious actor kept fixing his hair.
4. Showing the effects of self-consciousness; stilted: self-conscious prose.

self′-con′scious·ly adv.
self′-con′scious·ness n.

self-conscious

Being aware of oneself, esp. overly aware of appearance and actions, and thus being ill at ease.
References in periodicals archive ?
The last thing you want to do is make matters worse, yet adolescents are naturally self-conscious about their bodies.
Deborah Webb, with baby Arthur, admitted she felt self-conscious at first, feeding in public.
q: "My flaky scalp is making me so self-conscious. No matter how often I wash my hair, the dandruff keeps coming back, and it really itches.
Unfortunately, he contends, it is a bad thing that the US is largely not self-conscious of itself as an empire and is therefore unable to learn from the achievements and failures of past empires and is likely to remain non-self-conscious for the foreseeable future.
"He used to go to the gym, but said he felt really self-conscious because there were mainly adults there."
The first of three chapters takes up the least self-conscious of three types of historical comparisons--the broad tendency to set the South apart from the rest of the United States, which Kolchin calls the "un-South." Divergences between a unified region (which is often seen as aberrant and outside the mainstream) and the rest of the United States (typically assumed to be normative) derives from the nineteenth century South's defining features--the embrace of slavery by regional elites and the rebellion on behalf of slavery mounted by these men and women during the Civil War.
Forget what you think you know about self-conscious straight women who keep track of every pound they lose or gain.
Adam's inventiveness in Il Nodo, danced to a taped collage of Renaissance music, is far less self-conscious. The playful work is packed with choreographic ideas that have the dancers, costumed by Christine Darch in black and-white abstractions of Renaissance garb, moving like puppets or wooden dolls in ah expert visualization of the rough-hewn sound of the music.
It is so self-conscious, so apparently moral, simply to step aside from the gaps where the creeks and winds pour down, saying, I never merited this grace, quite rightly, and then to sulk along the rest of your days on the edge of rage.
the self-conscious and self-active person, which is the presupposition for ethical relevance.
It is a self-conscious attempt to read the present through the past in order to elucidate some of the peculiarities of Italian life.
There is an unmistakable awkwardness in trying to wirte a book like this, essentially placing your life in the context of a greater movement, without trying to sound too self-conscious or attempt at aggrandizement.

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