self-concern


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Related to self-concern: self-involvement, self-centered, self-seeking

self-concern

(sĕlf′kən-sûrn′)
n.
Selfish or excessive concern for oneself.

self′-con·cerned′ adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
DB: Yes, a person who has self-concern may feel he's paying attention but he's simply concerned with himself.
(5) The movement of incurvatus is actually fiercer here than when it collapses down to the vanishing point of pure individual self-concern, for it gains tremendous energy and moral force by living as concern for some group of vulnerable others.
The aforementioned perspective is based on the basic assumption that the motivation behind human behavior is a type of self-concern. Therefore, the expected satisfaction with intrinsic and extrinsic motivation could lead to the performance of altruistic behavior.
Now Parfit might say that it is the doctor's self-concern and not the wrong of the involuntary sacrifice that justifies this judgment.
Instead, personal identity is constituted by certain patterns of identification and self-concern. If one comes to identify sufficiently deeply with the interests of all others, then "one stands to all others in the identity-constituting relation that one formerly stood in just to oneself." (185) Such a person "acquires a new face every time a baby is born." (185)
While Freud had dismissed amour propre as an infantile indulgence, Kohut championed self-concern as the linchpin of mature, robust personhood.
Initially, teachers express a high level of self-concern regarding their own ability to be successful in the classroom.
The authors also explore how self-concern, which can be exhibited through self-monitoring behavior, is related to mum.
All of these studies and programmes already undertaken make imperative the recovery within every congregation of the missionary dynamic which will enable Christians, as individuals and as communities, to break out of their walls of self-concern to witness the love of Christ within every level of the institutions which govern their activities, in their neighbourhoods, in the market-place, in the home, as well as to the ends of the earth.
Heckhausen (1982) also believes that it is self-concern and not emotionality that negatively correlates with performance.
Clearly there is an evil self-concern; as the devil always apes
Thus, this discussion addresses contexts in which narratives of self-concern (bodily regimes) signify a retreat into the self, that is, into pre-established cultural shells.