self-concept

(redirected from self-concepts)
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self-con·cept

an individual's sense of self, including self-definition in the various social roles one enacts, including assessment of one's own status with respect to a single trait or to many human dimensions, using societal or personal norms as criteria.

self-concept

(sĕlf′kŏn′sĕpt)
n.
The mental image or perception that one has of oneself.

self-concept

the composite of ideas, feelings, and attitudes that a person has about his or her own identity, worth, capabilities, and limitations. Such factors as the values and opinions of others, especially in the formative years of early childhood, play an important part in the development of the self-concept.

self-con·cept

(self kon'sept)
An assessment of one's own status with respect to one or several traits, using societal or personal norms as criteria.

self-con·cept

(self kon'sept)
Individual's sense of self, including self-definition in various social roles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies have made note of the association between one's perceived academic ability and belonging, known as academic self-concept, and academic success (Johnson, 2005; Pittman & Richmond, 2008).
Mathematics Self-concept scale by Marsh (1948) was used to know students' academic self-concept.
Raghwan and Archna Dogra, Self-concept scale by Saraswat (1997).
This study contributes to our understanding of children's academic self-concept by exploring self-reported literacy and numeracy self-concepts of children aged four to five years.
An adolescent's potential to solve problems, knowledge of moral codes and social norms, and growing consciousness towards adulthood all play very important role in the development of self-concept (Burns, 1979).
To date, no studies are known that combine both aspects of teachers' professional self-concept and their professional knowledge, and address teachers' self-concepts of their CK, PCK, and PPK, although it is accepted that the confidence in one's abilities affects the person's willingness to initiate coping behavior and to expend effort to a particular task (Bandura, 1977).
This study examines the impact of academic failure on the self-concept of the students.
Other authors have also reported that children under 7 years of age do not use social comparison information in forming their self-concepts but are focused on absolute physical and behavioral characteristics (Harter, 1988)
Many authors agree on the view that physical activity positively affects self-concept (Balaguer & Garcia-Merita, 1994; Sonstroem, 1997; Zulaika & Goni, 2002), and more specifically, physical self-concept, especially in the perceptions of sport ability, physical condition and strength, both in amateur (Contreras, Fernandez, Garcia, Palou, & Ponseti, 2010; Esnaola, 2005; Moreno, Cervello, & Moreno, 2008) and elite athletes (Arostegi, Goni, Zubillaga, & Infante, 2013).
The authors explored the relationship between academic self-concept and noncognitive variables (i.
Self-concept is one of the significant psychological concepts for many of the developmental, clinical, social, and specifically educational outputs, it is in the common sense the positive self concept may contribute positively in enhancing the academic achievement level, as it consisted of two elements, descriptive and evaluative, the first represents the first represents the individual's personal belief or what can be called the self image (Marsh, a 1990).