self-compatible

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self-compatible

(sĕlf′kəm-păt′ə-bəl)
adj.
Capable of self-fertilization.

self′-com·pat′i·bil′i·ty n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thus far, self-compatibility and selfpollination has been documented in six Pitcairnia species (Wendt, Canela, de Faria, & Rios, 2001; Wendt, Canela, Klein, & Rios, 2002; Fumero-Caban & Melendez-Ackerman, 2007; Bush & Guilbeau, 2009).
While 40% of the plants tested for autogamy produced at least one fruit and 31 % showed evidence of self-compatibility, total fruits produced in either set of crosses was low.
Zhuang, "Insertion mutation of pollen SFB gene in self-compatibility of Japanese apricot cultivars native to China," Acta Horticulturae Sinica, vol.
Hoshikawa et al., "Characterization of fruiting and pollen tube growth of apple autotetraploid cultivars showing self-compatibility," Journal of the Japanese Society for Horticultural Science, vol.
Self-compatibility may be responsible for a higher production of fruit in natural conditions caused by the process of automatic self-pollination in B.
While hand-pollinations would have been the most straightforward way of testing self-compatibility, it proved to be too difficult to make these manipulations accurately under field conditions.
However, postzygotic inviability could result from either inbreeding depression or late-acting self-compatibility or even a combination of the two processes.
Self-compatibility and autonomous self-fertilization.--To determine whether Galax is self-compatible and whether the degree of self-compatibility differs between cytotypes, we self-pollinated flowers on six plants in single cytotype populations and three diploid and three tetraploid plants in mixed cytotype populations.
Self-compatibility index (SCI) was estimated by dividing the number of fruits or seeds produced in self-pollinated (SP) flowers by the number of fruits or seeds from cross-pollinated (CP) flowers.
THE GENUS Fagopyrum is composed of 18 species (Ohsako et al., 2001) and contains both diploid (2n = 2x = 16) and tetraploid (2n = 4x = 32) forms, with two breeding systems, self-incompatibility and self-compatibility. The predominant system in Fagopyrum, self-incompatibility, was first discovered by Darwin (1877) and belongs to the sporophytic system (Dahlgren, 1922) expressed in the pin and thrum flower type.
The study's purpose was to determine the pollinators, degree of self-compatibility, and degree of pollen limitation for E.