selenium

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selenium

 [sĕ-le´ne-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 34, atomic weight 78.96, symbol Se. (See Appendix 6.) It is an essential mineral nutrient. Dietary sources of selenium include seafoods, kidney, and liver. Humans can adjust their homeostasis mechanism for selenium over a wide range of dietary intakes. Recommended intake levels are generally met from the diet, so that supplements are not necessary.
selenium sulfide
1. the sulfide salt of selenium, a topical antiseborrheic and antifungal applied topically to the scalp to control seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff; also used topically in the treatment of tinea versicolor.
2. the sulfide salt of selenium, an antiseborrheic and antifungal; used topically in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff of the scalp and of tinea versicolor.

se·le·ni·um (Se),

(sĕ-lē'nē-ŭm),
A metallic element chemically similar to sulfur, atomic no. 34, atomic wt. 78.96; an essential trace element toxic in large quantities that is required for glutathione peroxidase and a few other enzymes; 75Se (half-life equal to 119.78 days) is used in scintography of the pancreas and parathyroid glands.
[G. selēnē, moon]

selenium

A non-metallic element (atomic number 34; atomic weigh 8.96) that is required in trace amounts by certain enzymes (e.g., glutathione peroxidase); it interacts with vitamins A, C and E, serving as an antioxidant. Selenium is believed to be anticarcinogenic, to retard ageing, and has been used for arthritis, cataracts, connective tissue disease, dandruff and age-related vision loss.  

Sources
Brewer’s yeast, cereals, dairy products, fish, fruits, liver, organ and muscle meats, seafood, vegetables and whole grains.

se·le·ni·um

(sĕ-lē'nē-ŭm)
A metallic element chemically similar to sulfur; atomic no. 34, atomic wt. 78.96; an essential trace element toxic in large quantities; required for glutathione peroxidase and a few other enzymes; 75Se (half-life equal to 119.78 days) is used in scintography of the pancreas and parathyroid glands.
[G. selēnē, moon]

selenium

A trace element recently found to be an essential component of the enzyme deiodinase which catalyses the production of triiodothyronine (T3) from thyroxine (T4) in the thyroid gland. Selenium deficiency prevents the formation of T3.

se·le·ni·um

(sĕ-lē'nē-ŭm)
A metallic element used in scintography of pancreas and parathyroid glands.
[G. selēnē, moon]
References in periodicals archive ?
Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS) solar cell is one of the best thin film candidate to look into because its lab scale efficiency (22.6%) has just surpassed CdTe's lab scale efficiency (22.1%) based on the latest research cell record efficiency chart reported by NREL [37].
[23] used a nucleophilic substitution reaction of pure sodium selenide with chloro-derivative 2 to prepare the selenoether in 55% yield.
Under waterlogged conditions, selenate gets reduced to selenite or selenide forms having greater affinity for soil exchange complex.
Evident's semicondutor nanocrystals are 2- to 10-nm-dia, composed of lead selenide, cadmium telluride (CdTe) with or without cadmium sulfide shells, and CdSe with or without zinc sulfide shells.
Auger profiling data are consistent with a process in which selenium vapor reacts at the surface of the metal oxide to form the metal selenide, which subsequently diffuses into the film.
Padiyan, "Effect of structural, electrical and optical properties of electrodeposited bismuth selenide thin films in polyaniline aqueous medium," Materials Chemistry and Physics, vol.
This is likely, because the ramping rate for furnace annealing of these cases is far slower than for rapid thermal annealing processes; so, the time required to reach the desired temperature is sufficient for selenide compounds to form, ultimately developing CIGS [16].
It was originally exploited for silver; the selenides were not identified until 1935, albeit on a sample collected during the first period of mining.
Cui, "Morphology control of layer-structured gallium selenide nanowires," Nano Letters, vol.
Nanoscale selenides are interesting to study the variation of a material's property with size and the ability to perform shape control.
The two selenides form porous, blackish nuggets resembling heterogenite, but distinguished from it by their yellowish metallic luster.
Sulfides, Including Selenides and Tellurides: Class 2, 113 pages, 341 descriptions, 3.02 per page