selection coefficient


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se·lec·tion co·ef·fi·cient (s),

the proportion of progeny or potential progeny not surviving to sexual maturity; usually defined artificially by expressing the fitness of a phenotype as a fraction of the mean or optimal fitness to give the relative fitness, and subtracting this fraction from unity. If the mean size of family in the population is 3.2 and that for a particular genotype is 2.4 then the fitness of the phenotype is 2.4/3.2 = 0.75 and the selection coefficient = 1 - 0.75 = .25.

se·lec·tion co·ef·fi·cient

(s) (sĕ-lek'shŭn kō'ĕ-fish'ĕnt)
The proportion of progeny or potential progeny not surviving to sexual maturity; usually defined artificially by expressing the fitness of a phenotype as a fraction of the mean or optimal fitness to give the relative fitness, and subtracting this fraction from unity.If the mean size of family in the population is3.2 and that for a particular genotype is 2.4,then the fitness of the phenotype is 2.4/3.2 =0.75, and the selection coefficient =1- 0.75 =.25 = 5.

selection coefficient

see SELECTION PRESSURE.
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Models of quantitative genetic variation that depend on overdominance in fitness of the loci involved thus predict that this variation will be greatly reduced in populations with very high rates of selfing, although there may be little effect below some selfing rate that depends on the selection coefficients at the loci involved.
The effective selection coefficient [s.sub.m] acting on m at the quasi-equilibrium is
In the linear additive model, therefore, we can easily calculate the additive genetic variance and selection coefficient based on this theorem (Price, 1972; Hartl, 1988; Ewens, 1989).
The change of recessive allele frequency as the function of this frequency in the previous generation q and the selection coefficient s is calculated as (Crow & Kimura, 1970: eq.
This position is supported by the fact that estimates of the degree of inbreeding depression for fitness in Drosophila are in very good agreement with expectations based on the estimates of mutation rates, selection coefficients, and coefficients of dominance obtained from mutation-accumulation experiments (Simmons and Crow 1977; D.
Selection coefficients and differentials were considered to be significantly different from zero only if the 95% confidence interval did not include zero.
The resulting selection coefficients (s = 1 - [omega]) indicate that immigrants invading mature demes face much stronger selection gradients than invaders of young deme s (Table 4).
The [[Tau].sub.j] are a common type of kin selection coefficient, the slope of recipient genotype on actor genotype.
With synergistic epistasis, the selection coefficients of individual mutations are effectively magnified as deleterious mutations accumulate in a genome, and for mutations with equivalent effects, this has the effect of progressively reducing the probability of fixation, eventually to zero.
The selection coefficient of the advantageous allele was generally small, ranging from 0.002 to 0.02.
The selection coefficient estimates do not rely upon distributional assumptions (Lande and Arnold 1983), but the standard parametric significance tests assume normality of residuals (Neter et al.
The magnitude of the selection coefficient, S, for selection exerted on corolla flare by bumblebees at seed set was calculated from the slope of the regression line (Lande and Arnold 1983).