segregation

(redirected from segregations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

segregation

 [seg″rĕ-ga´shun]
the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn),
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass, for example, those with infectious diseases.
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or oocyte; for example, an individual heterozygous for a gene pair, Aa, will form gametes half containing gene A and half containing gene a.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

/seg·re·ga·tion/ (seg″rĕ-ga´shun)
1. the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.
2. the separation of different elements of a population.
3. the progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the various regions of the forming embryo.

segregation

(sĕg′rĭ-gā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of segregating or the condition of being segregated.
2. Genetics The separation of paired alleles or homologous chromosomes, especially during meiosis, so that the members of each pair appear in different gametes.

segregation

the separation of paired alleles during meiosis so that members of each pair of alleles appear in different gametes. See also Mendel's laws.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn)
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass (e.g., those with infectious diseases).
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or ovum.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

  1. the separation of HOMOLOGOUS CHROMOSOMES during anaphase 1 of MEIOSIS, to produce gametes containing only one allele of each gene. Such an occurrence is the physical mechanism underlying the first law of MENDELIAN GENETICS and is particularly important when the two separated alleles are different.
  2. an ability of bacterial REPLICONS to be partitioned accurately and evenly between daughter cells during CELL DIVISION. See par LOCUS.

segregation

the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.

adjacent segregation
during meiosis adjacent centromeres segregate together.
alternate segregation
when diagonally opposite centromeres segregate together.
References in periodicals archive ?
The result is that segregation of duties, a key element of effective internal control, may not be achievable to the extent desired.
A common theme is that management must have financial expertise if the business is going to rely on management oversight in lieu of traditional segregation of duties.
Others point to third-party involvement as a potential solution to segregation of duties weaknesses.
Use of external parties also can help achieve segregation of certain incompatible duties without investing in additional full-time resources .
Many software companies and IT auditors focus particular attention on segregation of duties issues.
Rather than approaching every SOD [segregation of duties] conflict with equal importance, risk-based segregation considers each conflict in the context of its effect on financial integrity and the likelihood of actual violations.
Thus, segregation of duties weaknesses must be considered within the broader context of key business risks and compensating controls.
Once these key risk areas are identified, management should ask the following questions, implementing segregation of duties where appropriate: