segregation

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segregation

 [seg″rĕ-ga´shun]
the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn),
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass, for example, those with infectious diseases.
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or oocyte; for example, an individual heterozygous for a gene pair, Aa, will form gametes half containing gene A and half containing gene a.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

(sĕg′rĭ-gā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of segregating or the condition of being segregated.
2. Genetics The separation of paired alleles or homologous chromosomes, especially during meiosis, so that the members of each pair appear in different gametes.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn)
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass (e.g., those with infectious diseases).
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or ovum.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

  1. the separation of HOMOLOGOUS CHROMOSOMES during anaphase 1 of MEIOSIS, to produce gametes containing only one allele of each gene. Such an occurrence is the physical mechanism underlying the first law of MENDELIAN GENETICS and is particularly important when the two separated alleles are different.
  2. an ability of bacterial REPLICONS to be partitioned accurately and evenly between daughter cells during CELL DIVISION. See par LOCUS.
References in periodicals archive ?
regulations indicates that segregationists did in fact assemble such a
Kilpatrick, segregationist editor of the Richmond News Leader, was one thing; but it was quite something else in the hands of armed and dangerous freckle-bellies, as Bill Emerson, Newsweek's Atlanta bureau chief, called the great unwashed.
Curiously, Woods does not discuss how the election of Ronald Reagan to the presidency in 1980 marked the coming of age of the "silent majority." By the 1980s, most former segregationists and southern conservatives became Republicans, and they spearheaded efforts to roll back civil rights legislation, dismantle welfare programs, abolish affirmative action, and promote "law and order" by expanding the prison-industrial complex.
After 16 years in the House, he succeeded arch segregationist John Stennis in the U.S.
Indeed, though the segregationists who were opposed to Brown made their voices heard on the floor of Congress, on national television, and in public forums, the president did not respond.
Between 1955 and early 1957 desegregation clashes in Hoxie, Arkansas (where integration ultimately prevailed), (12) and elsewhere pressured Faubus to tilt toward the segregationists. Meanwhile, even as the federal courts upheld the Blossom Plan over a challenge from black parents represented by the local NAACP branch's lawyer, Wiley Branton, (13) the board experienced the intensity of the segregationist campaign during a school board election in the spring of 1957.
Why did segregationists settle for these policies rather than continue to vote Democratic?
An article by Thomas Noer, a Carthage College humanities professor, "Segregationists and the World: The Foreign Policy of the White Resistance," highlights the frightening alignment of Southerners obsessed with regional sovereignty with the hard-core, world-conspiracy-theory conservatives, an alliance under the guise of anti-Communism we contend with even today.
Subsequently, the book moves through the lives and times of some of the key segregationists of the Civil Rights Era as a means of telling a story of legal and cultural transformation.
I also knew that Rustin had been convicted for public lewdness in the 1950s and that in the final days before the March on Washington, segregationists exposed the incident.
In 1961, Jones was appointed to the City Human Rights Commission for his success in building a multi-racial congregation despite unwelcome attention from segregationists.
That Senate Democrats might actually apply standards of ethics and judicial temperament--Pickering consorted with segregationists and challenged the Voting Rights Act--drew cries of foul from Republicans.