segregation

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segregation

 [seg″rĕ-ga´shun]
the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn),
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass, for example, those with infectious diseases.
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or oocyte; for example, an individual heterozygous for a gene pair, Aa, will form gametes half containing gene A and half containing gene a.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

(sĕg′rĭ-gā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of segregating or the condition of being segregated.
2. Genetics The separation of paired alleles or homologous chromosomes, especially during meiosis, so that the members of each pair appear in different gametes.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn)
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass (e.g., those with infectious diseases).
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or ovum.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

  1. the separation of HOMOLOGOUS CHROMOSOMES during anaphase 1 of MEIOSIS, to produce gametes containing only one allele of each gene. Such an occurrence is the physical mechanism underlying the first law of MENDELIAN GENETICS and is particularly important when the two separated alleles are different.
  2. an ability of bacterial REPLICONS to be partitioned accurately and evenly between daughter cells during CELL DIVISION. See par LOCUS.
References in periodicals archive ?
He allows segregationists to speak for themselves but does not shrink from judging their efforts as apologies for racial inequality and white domination.
did segregationist James Jackson Kilpatrick become interested in the
Ferguson case, which illustrates the illogic of maintaining a stringent racial divide, did not challenge the certitudes of Southern segregationists. The reason for this, according to Mark Smith, is that by the late nineteenth century whites had come to rely increasingly on a rich heritage of "sensory stereotypes" about blacks, myths that perpetuated racism and allowed white southerners to disregard obvious truths.
However, as a member of the Florida legislature in the 1930s, Collins was known as a segregationist and many of his views and votes reflected the norms of rural North Florida politics.
Kilpatrick, segregationist editor of the Richmond News Leader, was one thing; but it was quite something else in the hands of armed and dangerous freckle-bellies, as Bill Emerson, Newsweek's Atlanta bureau chief, called the great unwashed.
Perhaps then any institution where children of the same culture study together and appreciate their commonality is segregationist and should be undermined.
Staunch segregationists on school boards and in school attorney positions began to be threatened by the Ku Klux Klan when they acted to avoid loss of funding for their districts for the white children.
After 16 years in the House, he succeeded arch segregationist John Stennis in the U.S.
These segregationist policies led to a later Supreme Court decision--Griffin v.
The 1970 musical Purlie wickedly lampooned a southern segregationist. "While we were laughing, we were changing," said the daughter of its co-author, Ossie Davis, during a post-performance discussion at the City Center "Encores" series in New York.
Consider Essie Mac Washington Williams, the biracial daughter of the notorious segregationist U.S.
They are laying bare for all the nation to see, for all the world to know, the nature of segregationist resistance."