segregation ratio

seg·re·ga·tion ra·ti·o

in genetics, the proportion of progeny of a particular genotype or phenotype from actual matings of specified genotypes. The test of a mendelian hypothesis is the comparison of the segregation rate with the mendelian rate.

seg·re·ga·tion ra·ti·o

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn rā'shē-ō)
genetics The proportion of progeny of a particular genotype or phenotype from actual matings of specified genotypes. The test of a mendelian hypothesis is the comparison of the segregation rate with the mendelian rate.
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In contrast, crosses K132 x U00297 and K131 x U00297 when inoculated with 61:63 and 21:39, respectively, exhibited a segregation ratio of 7:9, suggesting the presence of complementary epistatic gene interactions (Table 5).
Though the analysis of chi square, the 314 (75.48%) polymorphic markers showed a compatible fit to the anticipated segregation ratio of 1:1 or 3:1, and 102 (24.52%) polymorphic markers gave a significant segregation distortion from the anticipated ratio of 1:1 or 3:1 (P = 0.05).
They described five individuals (two females and three males); all inbred; with segregation ratio of approximately 1/4 among eighteen siblings who had normal parents.
Seventy-seven segregation ratio tests were performed to determine if any departures from expected Mendelian inheritance occurred.
The transmission rates of MA1 in backcrosses did not deviate from normal (50%) and the segregation ratio in BEAU2 was about 1:2:1.
This paper reviews the use of a segregation ratio in analyzing changes in the pattern of socioeconomic segregation between schools in England and Wales, addressing how the modifiable areal unit problem affects results.
The segregation ratio is also subject to considerable variation: segregation ratios vary from as low as 0.20 to as high as 1.00 (Bennett et al.
Chi-square tests were performed for each marker locus to determine if the segregation ratio conformed to 1:1.
The observed segregation ratio for B, 85 branched (b b): 2 segregating (B b): 86 unbranched (B B), was not significantly different from the expected segregation ratio ([chi square] = 0.01,p = 0.91) for [F.sub.6:7] RILs (85.2 b b: 2.7 B b: 85.2 B B).
However, such frequency distributions were far from the expected 1:2:1 segregation ratio.
The [F.sub.2:3] rows in which all plants appeared GT were given a score of "1": rows with both GS and GT plants were scored "2": and rows in which all plants were GS were scored "3." In the [F.sub.2:3] rows with plants expressing both reactions, the numbers of GT and GS plants were determined to estimate the segregation ratio. A [chi square] test (P [less than or equal to] 0.05) was then used to test for significant differences between the observed GT:GS ratios and the ratio expected for segregation of a single trans-gene in the absence of gametic selection (3 GT:1 GS).
The expected 1:1 segregation ratio of the inheritance of parental alleles in the RILs was tested by the chi-square test.