sedimentation rate


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to sedimentation rate: Sedimentation coefficient

rate

 [rāt]
the speed or frequency with which an event or circumstance occurs per unit of time, population, or other standard of comparison.
adjusted rate a fictitious summary rate statistically adjusted to remove the effect of a variable, such as age or sex, to permit unbiased comparison between groups having different compositions with respect to these variables. See also crude rate and specific rate.
attack rate in the analysis of acute outbreaks of disease, the proportion of persons who are exposed to the disease during the outbreak who do become ill.
basal metabolic rate an expression of the rate at which oxygen is utilized in a fasting subject at complete rest as a percentage of a value established as normal for such a subject. Abbreviated BMR.
birth rate the number of live births in a geographic area in a defined period, usually one year, relative to some specified population. For the crude birth rate, it is the average total population or the midyear population in the area during the period. Specific birth rates for subsets of the population may also be calculated, for example, an age-specific birth rate is limited to the population of females of a defined age range.
case fatality rate the number of deaths due to a specific disease as compared to the total number of cases of the disease.
crude rate one giving the total number of events occurring in an entire population over a period of time, without reference to any of the individuals or subgroups within the population. See also adjusted rate and specific rate.
death rate the number of deaths in a certain period of time divided by the total of a given population. The crude death rate is the ratio of the number of deaths in a geographic area in one year divided by the average population in the area during the year. The age-specific death rate is the ratio of the number of deaths occurring in a specified age group to the average population of that group. The cause-specific death rate is the ratio of the number of deaths due to a specified cause to the average total population. Called also mortality rate.
Historic example of death rates (per 100,000) for leading causes of death for men aged 25–44 years. From Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 42:483, 1993.
DEF rate an expression of dental caries experienced in primary teeth, calculated by adding number of those requiring filling (D), decayed teeth requiring extraction (E), and those that have already been successfully filled (F); missing primary teeth are not included in the calculation.
DMF rate an expression of the condition of the permanent teeth based on the number of teeth decayed, missing (or indicated for removal), and filled or bearing restorations. It is calculated by adding the number of carious permanent teeth requiring filling (D), carious ones requiring extraction (Mr), ones previously extracted because of caries (Mp), and permanent teeth (F).
dose rate the amount of any therapeutic agent administered per unit of time.
erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) see erythrocyte sedimentation rate.
fatality rate the death rate in a specific group of persons simultaneously affected by some event or circumstances, such as a natural disaster.
fertility rate a measure of fertility in a defined population over a specified period of time, usually one year; particularly the general fertility rate, but also including more specific rates such as those for females of a given parity or a particular age range or that describing the completed rate for females who have finished childbearing.
fetal death rate the ratio of the number of fetal deaths in one year to the total number of both live births and fetal deaths in that year.
five-year survival rate an expression of the number of survivors with no trace of a given disease five years after each has been diagnosed or treated for the disease.
flow rate flow (def. 2).
forced expiratory flow rate forced expiratory flow.
general fertility rate the most widely used measure of fertility; the number of live births in a geographic area in a year per 1000 women of childbearing age, which is usually defined as age 15 to 44 years.
glomerular filtration rate an expression of the quantity of glomerular filtrate formed each minute in the nephrons of both kidneys, calculated by measuring the clearance of specific substances, e.g., inulin or creatinine.
growth rate an expression of the increase in size of an organic object per unit of time.
heart rate the number of contractions of the cardiac ventricles per unit of time (usually per minute).
incidence rate the risk of developing a particular disease during a given period of time; the numerator of the rate is the number of new cases during the specified time period and the denominator is the population at risk during the period. Compare prevalence r.
infant mortality rate the ratio of the number of deaths in one year of children less than one year of age to the number of live births in that year.
intrinsic rate in cardiac pacing terminology, the heart rate unaided by an artificial pacemaker, expressed in beats per minute (bpm). See also cycle length.
maternal mortality rate a rate in which the numerator is the number of maternal deaths ascribed to puerperal causes in one year; the number of live births in that year is often used as the denominator, although to make a true rate the denominator should be the number of pregnancies (live births plus fetal deaths). Called also puerperal mortality rate.
maximal expiratory flow rate (MEFR) maximal expiratory flow.
maximal midexpiratory flow rate (MMFR) maximal midexpiratory flow.
mendelian rate an expression of the numerical relations of the occurrence of distinctly contrasted mendelian characteristics in succeeding generations of hybrid offspring.
metabolic rate an expression of the amount of oxygen consumed by the body cells.
morbidity rate an inexact term that can mean either the incidence rate or the prevalence rate.
mortality rate death rate.
neonatal mortality rate the ratio of the number of deaths in one year of children less than 28 days of age to the number of live births in that year.
paced rate in cardiac pacing terminology, the rate of pulses of an artificial pacemaker, expressed as pulses per minute (ppm). See also cycle length.
perinatal mortality rate the ratio of the number of the sum of fetal deaths after 28 or more weeks of gestation (stillbirths) and deaths of infants less than 7 days of age in one time period and population to the sum of the number of live births and fetal deaths after 28 or more weeks of gestation (stillbirths) in that same time period and population.
postneonatal mortality rate the ratio of the number of deaths in a given year of children between the 28th day of life and the first birthday relative to the difference between the number of the live births and neonatal deaths in that year; the denominator is sometimes simplified, less correctly, to the number of live births. The ratio is sometimes approximated as the difference between the infant mortality rate and the neonatal mortality rate.
prevalence rate the number of people in a population who have a disease at a given time; the numerator is the number of existing cases of disease at a specified time and the denominator is the total population. Time may be a point or a defined interval, and is traditionally the former if unspecified. Compare incidence r.
puerperal mortality rate maternal mortality r.
pulse rate the rate of the pulse, measured as number of pulsations in an artery per unit of time; normally between 60 and 80 per minute in an adult.
respiration rate the number of inhalations and exhalations per unit of time, usually measured by observation of chest movements and averaging 16 to 20 per minute in an adult.
sedimentation rate the rate at which a sediment is deposited in a given volume of solution, especially when subjected to the action of a centrifuge; see also erythrocyte sedimentation rate.
slew rate in cardiac pacing, the rate, expressed in units of mV/msec, at which an R wave reaches peak amplitude; it represents the maximum rate of change of amplifier output voltage.
specific rate a rate that applies to a specific demographic subgroup, e.g., individuals of a specific age, sex, or race, giving the total number of events in relation only to that subgroup. See also adjusted rate and crude rate.
stillbirth rate fetal death rate.

sed·i·men·ta·tion rate

the rate at which a sediment is deposited from a solution.
See also: erythrocyte sedimentation rate.

sedimentation rate

Erythrocyte sedimentation rate A test that detects and monitors inflammatory activity by recording the rate at which RBCs settle–
sediment–in a test tube; the SR ↑ with inflammation, and usually performed by the Westergren method, see there.

sed·i·men·ta·tion rate

(sed'i-mĕn-tā'shŭn rāt)
The sinking velocity of blood cells, i.e., the degree of rapidity with which the red blood cells sink in a mass of drawn blood. It is used to detect and monitor inflammatory processes in the body: an elevated rate indicates a higher rate of inflammation.

sed·i·men·ta·tion rate

(sed. rate) (sed'i-mĕn-tā'shŭn rāt)
The sinking velocity of blood cells; used to detect and monitor inflammatory processes in the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
These groups were observed in localities of which sedimentation rates were low (Puerto Mio Externo and Las Gatas), and occasionally in Puerto Mio Interno with the highest sedimentation rates.
Both the C-reactive protein level and erythrocyte sedimentation rate have known value as markers of systemic inflammation and are indirect markers of disease activity and quality of life for patients with non-CF bronchiectasis (11).
The highest erythrocyte sedimentation rate was found to be 110 mm/h.
Evaluation of sealed vacuum extraction method (Seditainer) for measurement of erythrocyte sedimentation rate. J Clin Pathol 1989; 42:313-317.
2), which shows similar activities in the top 2 cm, implying mixing or a more rapid sedimentation rate in the past 30 years compared to lower horizons.
On the other hand, increased rates of osteomyelitis (p=0.02) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.04) were significantly associated with increased amputation rate.
The increased risk for CVD was associated with three markers of systemic inflammation: erythrocyte sedimentation rate above 60 mm/hour on three consecutive measurements, the presence of RA vasculitis, and the presence of RA lung disease (Arthritis Rheum.
Disease Activity Score 28(DAS28) using C-reactive protein underestimates disease activity and overestimates EULAR response criteria compared with DAS28 using erythrocyte sedimentation rate in a large observational cohort ofrheumatoid arthritis patients in Japan.
To enhance the FRS predictive power, they added measures of carotid plaque and intima-media thickness by carotid ultrasonography, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and cumulative glucocorticoid dose.
The stimulation on total sedimentation rates, total oxygen uptake (TOU), and N[H.sub.4.sup.+] and P[O.sub.4.sup.3] flux of the mussel farms was in the range of 0-92%, 0-67%, 52-290%, and 0-700%, respectively.
Recently, my sedimentation rate was elevated and a rheumatologist prescribed Hydroxychlor (generic name: plaquenil).