sedative

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sedative

 [sed´ah-tiv]
1. allaying irritability, excitement, or nervousness.
2. an agent that does this. The usual mode of action is depression of the central nervous system, which tends to cause lassitude and reduced mental activity. Sedatives are distinct from tranquilizers, which also have a calming effect but unlike sedatives usually do not suppress bodily reactions. Sedatives may be classified according to the organ most affected, such as cardiac, gastric, and so on. Called also calmative.



The degree of relaxation produced varies with the kind of sedative, the dose, the means of administration, and the mental state of the patient. By causing relaxation, a sedative may help a patient go to sleep, but it does not put him to sleep. Medicines that induce sleep are known as hypnotics (some drugs act as sedatives in small amounts and as hypnotics in large amounts). The barbiturates, such as phenobarbital, are the best known sedatives and are also widely used as hypnotics. Other effective sedatives include paraldehyde and chloral hydrate. Sedatives are useful in the treatment of any condition in which rest and relaxation are important to recovery. Some sedatives are also useful in treatment of convulsive disorders or epilepsy and in counteracting the effect of convulsion-producing drugs. They are used to calm patients before childbirth or surgery. Restlessness in invalids, profound grief in adults, and overexcitement in children can be controlled by medically supervised sedation. Because many sedatives are habit-forming, they should be used with caution.

sed·a·tive

(sed'ă-tiv),
1. Calming; quieting.
2. A drug that quiets nervous excitement; designated according to the organ or system on which specific action is exerted; for example, cardiac, cerebral, nervous, respiratory, spinal.
[L. sedativus; see sedation]

sedative

(sĕd′ə-tĭv)
adj.
Having a soothing, calming, or tranquilizing effect; reducing or relieving anxiety, stress, irritability, or excitement.
n.
An agent or a drug having a soothing, calming, or tranquilizing effect.

sedative

Herbal medicine
noun Nervine, see there.
 
Pharmacology
Any agent that acts on the CNS to attenuate responses to stimuli.
 
Activities of sedatives
Anxiolytic, sedative, anticonvulsant.
 
Adverse effects
Ataxia, loss of inhibitions, cardiac and respiratory depression, mental and physical dependence and/or tolerance.
 
Examples
Amobarbital, butabarbital, chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, ethchlorvynol, flurazepam, meprobamate, methyprylon, nordiazepam, pentobarbital, trichlorethanol.

Psychiatry adjective
Calming.

sedative

adjective Calming noun Pharmacology Any agent that acts on the CNS to attenuate responses to stimuli Activities Anxiolytic, sedative, anticonvulsant Adverse effects Ataxia, loss of inhibitions, cardiac and respiratory depression, psychologic and physical dependence, tolerance Examples Amobarbital, butabarbital, chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, ethchlorvynol, flurazepam, meprobamate, methyprylon, nordiazepam, pentobarbital, trichlorethanol

sed·a·tive

(sed'ă-tiv)
1. Calming; quieting.
2. A drug that quiets nervous excitement; designated according to the organ or system on which specific action is exerted, e.g., cardiac, cerebral, nervous, respiratory, spinal.

Sedative

Medicine that has a calming effect and may be used to treat nervousness or restlessness.

sed·a·tive

(sed'ă-tiv)
1. Calming; quieting.
2. Drug that quiets nervous excitement; designated according to organ or system on which specific action is exerted.
References in periodicals archive ?
(3) Our results confirmed that sedative drugs can have an effect on GI transit time and motility.
Future studies should focus on development of sedation protocols that will allow optimal usage of available sedative drugs to meet the increased sedation requirements in this important subgroup of patients.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released drug safety warning regarding repeated use of general anesthesia and sedative drugs in surgeries in children younger than 3 years, as it could severely affect their brain development.
Maya Mayer, from Russia, injected Anton with high doses of painkilling and sedative drugs so he did not scream during the thrashings, it is alleged.
And for the first time, physicians must check the NJPMP before prescribing benzodiazepines, a class of sedative drugs like Xanax, Ativan and Klonopin that, when taken in combination with opioids, increase the risk of a fatal overdose.
He further reveals that the LDEA also arrested some Sedative Drugs and expired pharmaceutical products form some medicine stores in the County.
Anesthesia Conduction Kits: Market Dynamics Increased in number of surgeries across the globe, development of new anesthetic and sedative drugs, reduction in cost of new invested drugs and decreased recovery time after surgery are the major factor which drive the market of anesthesia conduction kits market globally.
According to a previous study, the TEE probe generally does not obstruct the airway or disrupt spontaneous breathing in children.[3] Ideal sedative drugs enable infants to tolerate the stimulation due to TEE probe insertion without causing respiratory depression and/or hemodynamic instability.
The generalized stress produced by sedative drugs may also cause alteration in biochemical indices (Kinjavedekar et al., 2007).
SEDATIVE DRUGS GHL and its derivative GHB were recovered in small amounts.
Forty percent of the women reported long-term opioid use, and 24 percent of the women reported using both opioids and sedative drugs at the same time.
Among a variety of sedative drugs being used for sedation, propofol, a sedative-hypnotic agent, is widely used with its rapid effect, short recovery time, and antiemetic effect.