sedative


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Related to sedative: Sedative drugs

sedative

 [sed´ah-tiv]
1. allaying irritability, excitement, or nervousness.
2. an agent that does this. The usual mode of action is depression of the central nervous system, which tends to cause lassitude and reduced mental activity. Sedatives are distinct from tranquilizers, which also have a calming effect but unlike sedatives usually do not suppress bodily reactions. Sedatives may be classified according to the organ most affected, such as cardiac, gastric, and so on. Called also calmative.



The degree of relaxation produced varies with the kind of sedative, the dose, the means of administration, and the mental state of the patient. By causing relaxation, a sedative may help a patient go to sleep, but it does not put him to sleep. Medicines that induce sleep are known as hypnotics (some drugs act as sedatives in small amounts and as hypnotics in large amounts). The barbiturates, such as phenobarbital, are the best known sedatives and are also widely used as hypnotics. Other effective sedatives include paraldehyde and chloral hydrate. Sedatives are useful in the treatment of any condition in which rest and relaxation are important to recovery. Some sedatives are also useful in treatment of convulsive disorders or epilepsy and in counteracting the effect of convulsion-producing drugs. They are used to calm patients before childbirth or surgery. Restlessness in invalids, profound grief in adults, and overexcitement in children can be controlled by medically supervised sedation. Because many sedatives are habit-forming, they should be used with caution.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sed·a·tive

(sed'ă-tiv),
1. Calming; quieting.
2. A drug that quiets nervous excitement; designated according to the organ or system on which specific action is exerted; for example, cardiac, cerebral, nervous, respiratory, spinal.
[L. sedativus; see sedation]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sedative

(sĕd′ə-tĭv)
adj.
Having a soothing, calming, or tranquilizing effect; reducing or relieving anxiety, stress, irritability, or excitement.
n.
An agent or a drug having a soothing, calming, or tranquilizing effect.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sedative

Herbal medicine
noun Nervine, see there.
 
Pharmacology
Any agent that acts on the CNS to attenuate responses to stimuli.
 
Activities of sedatives
Anxiolytic, sedative, anticonvulsant.
 
Adverse effects
Ataxia, loss of inhibitions, cardiac and respiratory depression, mental and physical dependence and/or tolerance.
 
Examples
Amobarbital, butabarbital, chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, ethchlorvynol, flurazepam, meprobamate, methyprylon, nordiazepam, pentobarbital, trichlorethanol.

Psychiatry adjective
Calming.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

sedative

adjective Calming noun Pharmacology Any agent that acts on the CNS to attenuate responses to stimuli Activities Anxiolytic, sedative, anticonvulsant Adverse effects Ataxia, loss of inhibitions, cardiac and respiratory depression, psychologic and physical dependence, tolerance Examples Amobarbital, butabarbital, chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, ethchlorvynol, flurazepam, meprobamate, methyprylon, nordiazepam, pentobarbital, trichlorethanol
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sed·a·tive

(sed'ă-tiv)
1. Calming; quieting.
2. A drug that quiets nervous excitement; designated according to the organ or system on which specific action is exerted, e.g., cardiac, cerebral, nervous, respiratory, spinal.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Sedative

Medicine that has a calming effect and may be used to treat nervousness or restlessness.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

sed·a·tive

(sed'ă-tiv)
1. Calming; quieting.
2. Drug that quiets nervous excitement; designated according to organ or system on which specific action is exerted.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The decision to utilize a sedative medication should be made only after a thorough evaluation of dental treatment needs has been completed, a level of patient cooperation has been attained and the patient's current health status assessed.
You must also arrange for someone to take you home--you will not be allowed to drive because of the sedatives. The physician may give you other special instructions.
The odds ratios for BZD sedative use in this table are consistent with the relative risks reported in Table II.
While research has shown music can help reduce a patient's anxiety prior to surgery, previous studies have primarily focused on music versus an oral form of sedative medications, which are not routinely used in the preoperative setting.
He said his client then "carried out his own research" on the internet and came across the powerful sedative Xanax which he began to self-medicate with.
The stable's doctor said that the drugs were used as a sedative for horses and they are specially delivered from Uruguay.
"I had the sedative and you're supposed to stay awake while it's happening you're kind of aware but the next thing I know I woke up in recovery - it's all over, done, didn't remember a thing.
The aim of study is to determine sedative and analgesic effect of xylazine, ketamine and diazepam administered intra muscular (i.m.) in ducks in two different combinations patterns.
The aim of current study was to determine changes in serum cortisol levels produced by various combination of sedative drugs used to sedate horses during routine clinical procedures and minor surgeries, which required standing sedation.
The presence of chronic renal failure was associated with 76.1 percent lower odds, diabetes was associated with 52.8 percent lower odds, and obesity-was associated with 46.2 percent lower odds of PI sedative prescribing.
Here, the music intervention consisted of sedative music played for 45 minutes, where the participant could choose from one of six Western or Chinese music to listen to at bedtime.
TIMERGARA -- The residents of Jandol Dir Lower have demanded of the authorities of the health regulatory authority (HRA) and health department to check the sale of narcotics and sedative drugs in the open market.