sedate


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se·date

(sĕ-dāt'),
To bring under the influence of a sedative.
[L. sedatus; see sedation]

sedate

(sĭ-dāt′)
tr.v. se·dated, se·dating, se·dates
To administer a sedative to (a person or animal); calm by means of a sedative drug.

se·date

(sĕ-dāt')
To bring under the influence of a sedative.
References in periodicals archive ?
Denise Byron posted: "It was tied up, cold and terrified, surely they could've drugged meat to sedate it.
I suggested that they used tranquillisers to sedate it and calm it down because it was barking as people tried to feed it but they just kept saying it was an aggressive dog.
I respect that he stuck in and didn't quit but the stores are trying to sedate customers and Ed Sheeran does that.
The medics decided to sedate her at the scene to stabilise her condition.
Michael said: "They said they would have to sedate him and then he was transferred to the RVI.
Katherine later changed into a more sedate number to enjoy the races.
Summary: Fishing in Britian is known for being a sedate pasttime, but that cannot be said of Nigeria's Abaji Fishing Festival.
This latest project sees Hecker returning to Ramat Gan, but under rather more sedate circumstances.
A meditative exploration of the purpose of human existence in the physical world, especially if humans are considered to be spiritual beings, The Purpose of Physical Reality approaches challenging theological questions in a sedate, meticulous and serious-minded manner.
The nature of medications used to sedate children for painless procedures fosters tension between radiology departments on tight schedules and busy pediatricians at their offices.
A pure appearance package, the Zagato modifications take the sleek and sedate Harrier and give it the look of a rally car.
Officials used two tranquilizer darts to sedate the 300-pound bear and wardens released it into the wild north of Ojai.