sedate


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se·date

(sĕ-dāt'),
To bring under the influence of a sedative.
[L. sedatus; see sedation]

sedate

(sĭ-dāt′)
tr.v. se·dated, se·dating, se·dates
To administer a sedative to (a person or animal); calm by means of a sedative drug.

se·date

(sĕ-dāt')
To bring under the influence of a sedative.
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: The Crown Prince sedates it with a tranquiliser shot as he chases it in his 4WD
The Star Tribune reported last month on a draft report questioning whether Minneapolis officers inappropriately urged paramedics to sedate people with ketamine.
A lion escaped its enclosure at a Belgian zoo on Thursday and was shot dead by police after attempts to sedate the animal failed, the zoo said, drawing sharp criticism from animal rights groups and politicians.
Wildlife Alliance's Nick Marx said the group cannot use a dart gun to sedate animals without permission, which can take time to obtain, and in this case never formally came through.
So if they did sedate it then what when it came round?
But, unable to get close enough to sedate it, they shot it.
Bruce looked more comfortable later on a sedate caterpillar cart on the Alice in Wonderland ride with Emma.
Sheeran's music used to 'sedate' shoppers JOHN DINGWALL j.dingwall@dailyrecord.co.uk ED Sheeran's songs could be the modern equivalent of elevator music, according to a new chart.
The pool did not have any steps, and had to be emptied in order for authorities to sedate and remove the hippo via a crane.
Katherine later changed into a more sedate number to enjoy the races.